Tag: Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga

Andrew Colman Heritage New Zealand CE Interview On “Summer Times” RNZ National (RNZ National Podcast)

Lynne Freeman interviewed Andrew Colman on RNZ National "Summer Times".

"How is Heritage New Zealand planning to make best use of the 6.3 million dollars it received in last May's budget and is on top of the current operating funding of $13 million per year.
The new money's spread over four years, so it's a case of priorities for the organisation that's charged with protecting archaeological and heritage sites. We're joined by the Chief Executive of Heritage New Zealand, Andrew Coleman."

https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/summer-days/audio/2018678335/heritage-nz

“Oral history workshop a hit” (Heritage New Zealand Media Release)

Atareiria Heihei, Monica Heihei, Taina McGregor, Jack Kemp and Sarah Taiapo practice their video interview skills on the oral history workshop. (l-r)

"A workshop designed to help people hone their skills in recording oral history may be the first of many.
The two-day seminar, held in Kerikeri recently, was led by Taina McGregor, Oral History Advisor, Maori at the Alexander Turnbull Library, and has earned rave reviews from participants on the pilot course according to organiser Atareiria Heihei of Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga. "

“It was also great to be able to share this knowledge with other people who are working with oral history, or who want to become more involved. We’re looking forward to holding more of these two day courses next year, and will publicise dates and times once details are finalised.” 

A workshop on writing abstracts for recorded interviews is currently being organised for the new year

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Picture Postcard competition at Heritage New Zealand properties (Heritge New Zeland Media Release)

December 24

MEDIA RELEASE

Picture Postcard competition at Heritage New Zealand properties

Visitors to Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga’s properties in Northlandcould be in to win some special prizes in a photo competition running over the holiday break. 

From Boxing Day, Heritage New Zealand will run a ‘Picture Postcards’ series of Facebook posts celebrating some of the cool properties Heritage New Zealand cares for on behalf of all Kiwis.

Punters can drop a photo into any of the ‘Picture Postcards’ posts of them and their family and friends at one of Heritage New Zealand’s properties and go in the draw to win a copy of Landmarks – notable historic buildings of New Zealandby David McGill and Grant Sheehan.  

A copy of the book will be up for grabs with each post, and people are encouraged to get their friends to vote for their photo. At the end of the series the best overall photo will win a special prize.

Photos can be of any of Heritage New Zealand’s properties, not just from the daily post.  For more information on properties please visit http://www.heritage.org.nz/places/places-to-visit

Properties in Northland cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga are Kemp House / Stone Store, Te Waimate Mission, Pompallier Mission, Clendon House and Mangungu Mission. 

“Heritage New Zealand Picture Postcard competition” (HNZ Media Release)

December 19

MEDIA RELEASE

Heritage New Zealand Picture Postcard competition 

Visitors to Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga’s properties in Aucklandcould be in to win some special prizes in a photo competition running over the holiday break. 

From Boxing Day, Heritage New Zealand will run a ‘Picture Postcards’ series of Facebook posts celebrating some of the cool properties Heritage New Zealand cares for on behalf of all Kiwis – including Highwic and Alberton in Auckland.

Punters can drop a photo into any of the ‘Picture Postcards’ posts of them and their family and friends at one of Heritage New Zealand’s properties and go in the draw to win a copy of Landmarks – notable historic buildings of New Zealandby David McGill and Grant Sheehan.  

A copy of the book will be up for grabs with each post, and people are encouraged to get their friends to vote for their photo. At the end of the series the best overall photo will win a special prize.Photos can be of any of Heritage New Zealand’s properties, not just from the daily post.  For more information on properties please visit http://www.heritage.org.nz/places/places-to-visit

“Heritage role just like coming home for Ohaeawai resident” HNZ Media Release (28-02-18)

Heritage New Zealand’s Property Lead, Te Waimate and Hokianga Properties Alex Bell preparing a spit roast Hogget for the recent Waitangi Day cricket match at Te Waimate Mission. All in a day’s work – Alex’s third day of work actually.

February 28

MEDIA RELEASE

Heritage role just like coming home for Ohaeawai resident

For Ohaeawai resident Alex Bell, taking on a new role with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga is a bit like coming home.

The 31-year old was recently appointed Heritage New Zealand’s Property Lead, Te Waimate and Hokianga Properties;  a role that involves the management of New Zealand’s second oldest surviving building – Te Waimate Mission – as well as Mangungu Mission in Horeke and Clendon House in Rawene.

Alex has a particularly strong link to Clendon House.

“Dennis Cochrane, who was the father of Jane Clendon, was one of my ancestors. Jane, who married James Reddy Clendon, was instrumental in keeping Clendon House in the family after his death until it was eventually gifted to the NZ Historic Places Trust in the early 1970s,” says Alex.

“Besides that link, I grew up on a dairy farm near Lake Omapere and went to Okaihau Primary and College. Both sides of my family are long-time Northlanders with a good mix of 19thCentury links to the Hokianga, Bay of Islands and Whangarei.”

Discovering physical evidence of his ancestors on family land as a child was instrumental in forming an interest in history according to Alex.

“The objects I found poking out of the banks of the Hokianga Harbour were likely disposed of by them, so those old spoons and whiskey bottles created a more personal link between them and now,” he says.

Highlighting links that help bring history alive, as well as making stories and information accessible to the community, are objectives Alex wants to explore in his new role.

“I love to get into the gritty parts of the stories, and to find historical tidbits to incorporate into the story of a property or archaeological site that give it some personal context,” he says.

“Heritage New Zealand’s Hokianga properties were all established in the early phases of European settlement and are all Landmarks Whenua Tohunga. As well as travelling half way around the world, settlers had to build their lives in an unfamiliar nation, build relationships with a well established Maori population, and build the foundations of Missionary societies from which they had been sent – all while staying alive.”

Each of the physical buildings sit in landscapes that incorporate centuries of Maori settlement and politics, and have their own stories to tell.

“Te Waimate Mission is an untapped treasure – and that goes for Mangungu Mission and Clendon House too. There is a wealth of stories to be told beyond just those of key historical figures,” he says.

“They’re also beautiful places to enjoy. Te Waimate Mission, for example, is perfect for people to bring a picnic and sit under the trees.”

Te Waimate is a far cry from Western Australia where Alex worked as a contract archaeologist prior to returning to New Zealand. He is enjoying being able to walk through knee-deep grass without having to worry about standing on a sleeping snake, or surveying in the bush and getting covered in kangaroo ticks. Neither does he miss being away for weeks at a time, the relentless heat and sleeping in a swag by the fire.

“I certainly loved it there, though. A beer at sunset with your mates after a 10-hour work day in 45 degree heat, looking over a mountain range of premium grade iron ore – that’s the good life,” he says.

After working as an archaeologist in the north following his return from Australia, Alex is looking forward to the next step of his heritage journey. And his family connections make it all the more personal.

“One of my ancestors, William Robinson, is buried in the Mangungu cemetery – so this job is kind of like caretaking a bit of family history I suppose,” he says.

 

 

“Landmarks Whenua Tohunga”- Details Of the Heritage Initiative (Sourced MCH Website)

(Image sourced Ministry Culture and Heritage)

Landmarks Whenua Tohunga : 

Northland and Otago are the  two Landmarks Whenua Tohunga that have been launched thus far. The Ministry of Culture and Heritage (MCH) has the following explanation and details on its website.

The following explanatory quotes were taken from the MCH site:

"Landmarks Whenua Tohunga promotes New Zealand's unique culture and connects visitors to our stories and places.

Landmarks is a partnership between Manatū Taonga - Ministry for Culture and Heritage, the Department of Conservation Te Papa Atawhai, and Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga. The programme provides a unified approach to promoting and encouraging people to visit New Zealand’s historically and culturally important places. (more…)

“Art Deco Day at Highwic” Art Deco Day Out At Highwic, Sunday 8 April, 1pm to 6pm (HNZ Heritage This Month March 2018)

Wonderful Highwic. (Credit: Grant Sheehan)

Art Deco Day at Highwic

Auckland’s Own Art Deco Day Out will make a grand entrance once again at Highwic on 8 April (1pm to 6pm).

The 150-year-old mansion in Newmarket, which is cared for by Heritage New Zealand, will throw open its gates for the annual festival of all things Deco including live jazz performed at the Cup Cake Café on-site, and a sparkling array of classic cars from the days of flappers and swingers.

Refreshing G&Ts will also be on sale for the day at Hendrick’s Gin Bar, and a range of stalls selling quality vintage products will also be operating within Highwic’s grounds.  If that isn’t enough, Highwic’s shop will also be selling its range of Victorian style vintage greeting cards, games, books, crafts and more.

The hotly contested Glory Days Costume Competition will be held once again.  The contest is free to enter and fabulous prizes from Minnie Cooper, Glory Days, Hendrick's Gin and Highwic will be awarded to the Best Dressed Lady, Gent and Child.

The team from Gin Mill Swing will also host a free dance class early on so people can learn some fancy moves before dancing the afternoon away to live jazz from the New Orleans Joymakers.

The wonderful world of Art Deco provides the ultimate in feel-good nostalgia, says Highwic Property Lead Cheryl Laurie.

“The $5 admission fee is also great value, enabling people to look around Highwic – though it will pay to bring some extra cash to enjoy some of the other attractions we’ll have on-site,” she says.

For more information on Auckland’s Own Art Deco Day Out – including parking directions – visit http://www.heritage.org.nz/news-and-events/events/highwic-art-deco-day

Don’t miss Auckland’s Own ). Admission: $5 per adult; children free. Refreshments not included in admission.

Caption: Wonderful Highwic.  Credit: Grant Sheehan 

“Support Auckland’s art community and Heritage New Zealand!”: exhibition at the Railway Street Gallery in Newmarket, Auckland, opens on 15 March and runs until 3 April. (HNZ Media Release)

Support Auckland's art community and Heritage New Zealand!

An exhibition of paintings by prominent artists with an interest in the protection and restoration of Auckland buildings and beyond is commencing soon at Railway St Studios in Auckland, with a percentage of the sales of the works going to support Heritage New Zealand’s work.

Four Auckland-based artists are concerned about the protection and documentation of our heritage. This art exhibition highlights cherished icons such as Rangitoto baches, the Esplanade Hotel, St Mary’s Bay villas, trams and cottages at Motat, to name a few.

"The images in this exhibition show something of this precarious and often threatened heritage," says artist David Barker.

"These works become part of a valuable inventory, described with great care. In them lies an archival documentation worth retaining as it touches us all, however brief our history.  What better way to capture the essence of our past and preserve it for future generations.”

The Past and Present exhibition and its core theme of protecting heritage is a great fit for Heritage New Zealand and it is pleased to get behind it.

"Any financial support that comes from the exhibition will help Heritage New Zealand to protect this country’s unique heritage and historic places,” says Heritage New Zealand's Manager of Asset Funding, Brendon Veale.

Featured artists are David Barker, John Horner, Graham Downs and Murray Dewhurst.

The exhibition at the Railway Street Gallery in Newmarket, Auckland, opens on 15 March and runs until 3 April.  For more information please click here.

Tohu Whenua “Name change better reflects programme meaning” (Heritage New Zeland Renames Landmarks Whenua Tohunga)

 

 

 

6 November2018

Name change better reflects programme meaning

 Tohu Whenua is the new name for a successful programme identifying and celebrating the significant historic and cultural places of Aotearoa.

“Tohu Whenua better reflects the programme’s increasingly national focus and meaning, replacing the original Landmarks Whenua Tohunga pilot name,” says Programme Manager Denise Stephens.

“Tohu Whenua acknowledges memories of the land, marking places made significant by our forebears and telling their stories.

“The initial pilot programme in Northland launched in late 2016 shows there is considerable pride taken by the selected sites, and this has been repeated in the second pilot programme launched in Otago in December 2017.

“Tohu Whenua is a better fit now that the programme has increased certainty as a nationwide marker of our heritage and history.

“We needed a name that was more appropriate than the original meaning of tohunga which can translate to one skilled in signs and marks.

“Now’s the right time to make the name change as the programme gathers momentum and we increase the promotion and appreciation of the Tohu Whenua.

“New Zealanders and international tourists are identifying and visiting these places, which is fantastic not only for the place, but also for the regional economy,” Denise Stephens says.

The name change coincides with the South Island’s West Coast selection as the third Tohu Whenua region, with a formal launch of chosen sites timed for early December 2018. A site selection process is being worked through.

“The West Coast is rich in history and heritage.  Early Māori sites, industrial sites reflecting the gold and coal mining activities, and other special buildings and places have made the selection process challenging, but enjoyable,” says Denise Stephens.

The programme, established in 2015, is delivered in partnership by Department of Conservation, Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, and Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage. These agencies were joined by the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment this year.

Ends (more…)

“Sad passing of heritage stalwart” Pam Wilson (2 March 1937 – 11 February 2018) [“Heritage This Month March 2018”]

"Sad passing of heritage stalwart" Pam Wilson (2 March 1937 - 11 February 2018)

Pam Wilson began work for the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT, now Heritage New Zealand) after being on the branch committee for some years in the early 1980s.  She worked on the Women’s/Promotions Committee, focusing on advocacy for heritage conservation, raising money to help with projects and elevating the profile of the organisation generally, including gaining more members.  In January 1989 Pam began work as the NZHPT Regional Officer for Canterbury, based first in a tiny office in what was then the Peterborough Centre, administered by the Arts Centre.  The office moved for a short time into the Cranmer Centre and then to the former Canterbury Provincial Council Buildings.  Gradually other staff joined Pam and, with her leadership, the team made huge strides in the recognition and protection of a wealth of historic places throughout Canterbury and the West Coast.

Pam was instrumental in saving many historic places in Canterbury and the West Coast, including the Nurses' Memorial Chapel and the Edmunds Factory Gardens.  She sat on many trusts, including the Riccarton House and Bush Trust and the Ngaio Marsh House and Heritage Trust, and was on 'cup of tea and biscuit' status with all of the Category 1 owners of Canterbury's large homesteads.  She was also a very astute negotiator and would front to developers and tell them how important historic places were.

By the time of her retirement in 2007, Pam’s office had been in the NZHPT offices in Gough House on Hereford Street.  Practically every file we open in the Christchurch office has her handwriting or other mark of her involvement, and even after she officially retired, she helped with work on research and registrations, such as the Kate Sheppard House in Ilam.  Like the rest of us, she was devastated about the loss of so much heritage in the Canterbury quakes of 2010 and 2011, but rejoiced in what has been able to be saved.

Pam was an absolute legend and her deep knowledge, kind and gentle manner, curiosity and dedication is widely recognised, both within Heritage New Zealand and in the wider community.  In 2007 she received two distinguished awards – the Christchurch City Council’s Civic Award and the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to heritage conservation.

Robyn Burgess, Heritage New Zealand

Historic Places Canterbury was saddened to learn of Pam Wilson's passing.

Robyn Burgess and Heritage New Zealand has generously given us permission to post the Tribute to Pam Wilson that appeared in  Heritage This Month March 2018.