Tag: Media Release

“Celebrate Suffrage 125 at Alberton” Heritage New Zealand Media Release

Suffragist Sophia Louisa Taylor of Alberton, the historic mansion in Mt Albert cared for by Heritage New Zealand. (HNZ Media Release)

September 7

MEDIA RELEASE

Celebrate Suffrage 125 at Alberton

The first of a series of community art workshops commemorating 125 years of women’s suffrage will begin at Alberton in Auckland on September 22.

The workshop at this Mt Albert mansion will be led by Dunedin artist Janet de Wagt with support from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, and is free to anybody who would like to take part. Participants will create a commemorative banner that will be joined with other banners made in other workshops at key heritage locations around the country over the next few months.

The banners will be amalgamated into one final artwork and launched at Old Government Buildings in Wellington in April next year.

“The banners are a reference to three Parliamentary petitions that were circulated around the country that resulted in women finally being granted the right to vote on 19 September 1893,” says the Manager of Alberton, Rendell McIntosh.

One of the petitions, which was circulated in 1893, includes the signatures of Sophia Louisa Taylor – the owner of Alberton – and her daughter Winifred.

“It’s very appropriate that the workshop is taking place at Alberton,” says Rendell.

“Sophia became a member of the first committee of the Auckland branch of the Women’s Franchise League and used her wit, intelligence and energy to make resolutions and speeches in favour of women’s suffrage.”

Sophia Taylor supported the franchise movement for the practical reason that if women had to obey laws and pay taxes like men, surely they also deserved the vote. Like many other socially prominent women, she also supported the Auckland Tailoresses Union.

“The petition that Sophia and Winifred signed was described by suffragist Kate Sheppard as a “monster petition” consisting of petition sheets circulated throughout New Zealand, and returned to Christchurch where Sheppard pasted each sheet end on end and rolled it around a section of a broom handle,” says Rendell.

“The ‘Monster Petition’ survives, and contains 25,519 signatures – including some men.”

The roll was presented to Parliament with great drama. Sir John Hall, Member of Parliament and suffrage supporter, brought it into the House and unrolled it down the central aisle of the debating chamber until it hit the end wall with a thud.

“The banners will be an artistic representation of that extraordinary social movement that ultimately saw New Zealand becoming the first country in the world to grant women the right to vote,” he says.

Artistic ability is not necessary for people to take part in the workshops – and Janet de Wagt is looking forward to working with a range of different ideas and skills. Alberton will also be hosting a Suffragists Tea on September 22 and 23 which, he says, is another good reason to come along and take part.

The tea will include a plum cake made from Sophia’s recipe by Marist College students (tea or coffee $6 per person, or $10 to view the house).

“Participants will be able to use painting, printing, stamping, drawing and weaving – whatever they prefer – to create the banners,” he says.

“Participation is the important thing – and celebrating a movement that changed New Zealand and the world forever.”

Janet de Wagt bio for promotion

Celebrate Suffrage 125 with Heritage New Zealand- Auckland Events

 

 

 

September 3

MEDIA RELEASE

Celebrate Suffrage 125 with Heritage New Zealand

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga staff across the country are involved in a number of events to commemorate and promote Suffrage 125 this month and beyond.

A particular highlight will be a series of suffrage themed community art workshops at six heritage properties in Auckland (Alberton, Sept 22); Christchurch (Ferrymead Heritage Park, Oct 14); Wellington (Old Government Building, Oct 29); Dunedin (Otago Pioneer Women’s Memorial Hall, Nov 3); Oamaru (Totara Estate, Nov 10) and in Northland (Clendon House, Rawene, Nov 24).

Renowned community artist, Janet de Wagt, is partnering with Heritage New Zealand to deliver an experience in which participants will use painting, printing, stamping, drawing and weaving to create a series of banners inspired by the stories of women’s suffrage.

“We’re really excited about involving new groups in heritage and suffrage history,” says Heritage New Zealand Canterbury-West Coast Outreach Advisor, Rosemary Baird, who is coordinating the community art workshops.

Auckland:

  • At Alberton, Auckland, on 22 September,a National Banner art event – for community groups and local craftspeople.  Free entry.
  • At Alberton, Auckland, on 22 and 23 September, ‘Suffragists' Tea’– served from vintage china and with plum cake.

Celebrate Suffrage 125 with Heritage New Zealand- Christchurch Events

 

 

 

September 3

MEDIA RELEASE

Celebrate Suffrage 125 with Heritage New Zealand

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga staff across the country are involved in a number of events to commemorate and promote Suffrage 125 this month and beyond.

A particular highlight will be a series of suffrage themed community art workshops at six heritage properties in Auckland (Alberton, Sept 22); Christchurch (Ferrymead Heritage Park, Oct 14); Wellington (Old Government Building, Oct 29); Dunedin (Otago Pioneer Women’s Memorial Hall, Nov 3); Oamaru (Totara Estate, Nov 10) and in Northland (Clendon House, Rawene, Nov 24).

Renowned community artist, Janet de Wagt, is partnering with Heritage New Zealand to deliver an experience in which participants will use painting, printing, stamping, drawing and weaving to create a series of banners inspired by the stories of women’s suffrage. Janet de Wagt bio for promotion

“We’re really excited about involving new groups in heritage and suffrage history,” says Heritage New Zealand Canterbury-West Coast Outreach Advisor, Rosemary Baird, who is coordinating the community art workshops.

Christchurch:

  • At Archives New Zealand, Christchurch, on 19 September, the day in 1893 when the Electoral Bill was formally passed, Heritage New Zealand’s Christchurch office is partnering with the Canterbury Museum and Archives New Zealand for an evening on how to research women’s stories. Tickets $20 on Eventfinda.
  • At Ferrymead Historic Village, Christchurch, on 14 October, National banner art event, as part of Christchurch Heritage Week.  Free entry.
  • At the Great Hall, Arts Centre, Christchurch, on 16 October, Suffrage Talk – A Cultural Journey with Kate Pickles and Angela Wanhalla as part of Christchurch Heritage Week.  Free entry.
  • Great Hall, Arts Centre, Christchurch, on 17 October, ‘Women on Fire’: Quick fire talks as part of Christchurch Heritage Week.  Free entry.

 

Full details of Suffrage 125 events involving Heritage New Zealand staff around the country are on the Heritage New Zealand website and Facebook, and  Eventfinda.

“Celebrate Suffrage 125 with Heritage New Zealand” HNZ Media Release

 

 

 

September 3

MEDIA RELEASE

Celebrate Suffrage 125 with Heritage New Zealand

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga staff across the country are involved in a number of events to commemorate and promote Suffrage 125 this month and beyond.

A particular highlight will be a series of suffrage themed community art workshops at six heritage properties in Auckland (Alberton, Sept 22); Christchurch (Ferrymead Heritage Park, Oct 14); Wellington (Old Government Building, Oct 29); Dunedin (Otago Pioneer Women’s Memorial Hall, Nov 3); Oamaru (Totara Estate, Nov 10) and in Northland (Clendon House, Rawene, Nov 24). (more…)

“Have your say on Mangungu Mission….” Close Off Date 4pm On Friday 24 August 2018.

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga is seeking feedback on its draft conservation plan for the Mangungu Mission House at Horeke.

 

 

 

July 13

MEDIA RELEASE

Have your say on Mangungu Mission….

People can now have their say on the future care of one of Northland’s most important historic places.

A conservation plan for Mangungu Mission – the site of the Wesleyan Mission that was established in 1828, and which later became the site of the largest signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the place where honey bees were first introduced into New Zealand – is now available for people to give feedback.

The process will be overseen by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga which manages the Category 1 historic place, and will include public meetings at Kohukohu, Rawene and Horeke.

“The purpose of the plan is to provide guidance on the care and management of the Mission House, and to protect and conserve its cultural heritage significance for future generations,” says Heritage New Zealand’s Property Lead Hokianga Properties, Alex Bell.

“Thanks to the success of the new cycleway, Mangungu Mission is no longer the quiet backwater it may have been five years ago. It’s increasingly becoming a tourism destination in its own right, and is also one of Northland’s Landmarks Whenua Tohunga.

“It’s important that we care for and maintain this very important building well, and that means getting the conservation plan right – because ultimately the plan will guide us on things like maintenance and restoration as well as interpretation, and even promotion of Mangungu Mission.”

Hokianga iwi and hapu have a close connection to Mangungu Mission, and the original signing of the Treaty in the Hokianga on February 12 1840 is commemorated by the community every year. The Mangungu signing of 1840 drew about 3000 people on the day, with about 70 rangatira signing Te Tiriti after a period of rigorous debate.

“Many people feel a strong connection to Mangungu for its Tiriti and mission history, and we would like to hear from anybody who has an interest in this place to find out their stories and associations, and why the place is important to them,” says Alex.

“The information we collect during this process will help inform the conservation plan.”

The primary focus of the plan is the mission house itself, which has had a fascinating history. Originally constructed in 1839, it is one of this country’s oldest buildings.

“Amazingly, the house was shipped down to Onehunga in Auckland where it was used as a parsonage and home. It was then trucked back up to Mangungu where it was reassembled on the original site of the mission in 1972,” says Alex.

“Even though it has been shifted, the house has important heritage fabric and values, reflecting the story of early contact between Maori and Europeans, the introduction of Christianity and, of course, Te Tiriti.”

Once consultation has been completed, comments received will be evaluated and written into the plan as appropriate. The plan will then be presented to the Heritage New Zealand Board and Maori Heritage Council for approval prior to being adopted and implemented.

As well as the public meetings, people are also able to lodge written comments about the plan to be received by Heritage New Zealand no later than (4.00pm) August 24, 2018.

“Everyone who has an interest in Mangungu Mission is invited to the meetings or to make a submission,” says Alex.

“Mangungu is important to a lot of people, and we want to ensure the Conservation Plan is the best it can be.”

The draft conservation plan has been publicly notified and is available on the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga website http://www.heritage.org.nz/protecting-heritage/consulting-on

A reference copy will be also available at the meetings as well as in the Northland Area office (62 Kerikeri Road, Kerikeri).

Please send your written comments to the following address by 4pm on Friday 24 August 2018.

Calum Maclean
Policy Advisor Kaitohutohu Kaupapa Here
Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga
PO Box 2629
Wellington 6140.

email: cmaclean@heritage.org.nz.

“Roll on spring…” (2018)- HNZ Media Release

 

 

 

A very early daffodil at Kemp House. (Image HNZ Media Release)

August 10

MEDIA RELEASE

Roll on spring…

The first signs of warmer weather have already arrived at Kemp House in Kerikeri.

This little beauty burst into life recently – and there’s more on the way.

Enjoy these and other seasonal delights at the Kerikeri Mission Station – a Landmark Whenua Tohunga cared for by Heritage New Zealand (open all weekend).

“Te Pakanga o Ōhaeawai listed as a Wahi Tapu” HNZ Media Release

 

 

 

July 30

MEDIA RELEASE

Te Pakanga o Ōhaeawai listed as a Wahi Tapu

The pā at Ōhaeawai today. The pā also incorporates the urupā, in the middle of which stands Te Whare Karakia o Mikaere [St Michael’s Church].

One of the most important battle sites of the Northern Wars has been recognised by the country’s lead heritage agency as an area sacred to Māori.

Te Pakanga o Ohaeawai has been added to the New Zealand Heritage List as a Wāhi Tapu Area by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.

Under the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act, a Wāhi Tapu is defined as a place sacred to Maori in the traditional, spiritual, religious, ritual or mythological sense.

“Te Pakanga o Ōhaeawai is a hillside near Ngāwhā where a faction of Ngāpuhi under Te Ruki [The Duke] Kawiti successfully defended the pā of Pene Taui, of Ngāti Rangi, against British forces led by Lieutenant Colonel Despard in June-July 1845,” says Heritage New Zealand’s Northern Pouārahi, Atareiria Heihei.

“The fortifications were ground-breaking in every way, and became one of the prototypes for gunfighter warfare in later engagements.”

“The pā at Ōhaeawai is tapu to Ngāti Rangi as a place of battle and bloodshed. It also incorporates the urupā, in the middle of which stands Te Whare Karakia o Mikaere [St Michael’s Church].”

It is also the original site for the placename “Ōhaeawai”, although the name was exported to the nascent township 4km down the road in the 1870s.

The peaceful vista of today is very different from the scene of carnage that occurred on July 1, 1845 during the third major engagement of the Northern Wars.

“On June 25 about 600 troops from the 58thand 99thRegiments, the Royal Marines and militia – as well as approximately 300 warriors of Tāmati Wāka Nene – besieged about 100 men in Pene Taui’s pā at Ōhaeawai,” says Atareiria.

“Prior to the attack, Pene Taui had insisted that the battle take place at his pā, which Kawiti had agreed to. Kawiti subsequently fortified the pā for this purpose.”

 

The pā at Ōhaeawai – a watercolour by Cyprian Bridge. (Alexander Turnbull Library – ATV36328).

Kawiti and Taui did an exceptional job. The pā had two palisades – including a strong inner fence made of puriri logs set almost two metres into the ground with five metres of log standing above ground.

A curtain of flax matting hung on the exterior of the pā quenching musket ball fire, concealing the interior from the British and robbing them of such basic information as to whether or not their shelling was effective.

In addition, a trench located between the two palisades encircling the pā, provided protection for warriors reloading their muskets, who were then able to step up onto platforms that elevated them to ground level. From here they were able to fire their muskets almost completely concealed from the enemy.

If that wasn’t enough, some trenches extended beyond the shape of the pā to form bastions from which fighters could then shoot at attackers side-on as they attacked the pā. The coup de grace, however, was a series of rua [pits] that were underground compartments roofed with beams and timber – possibly the first example of an anti-artillery bunker.

The rua stood the defenders in good stead.

“The British established a four-gun battery on the nearby hill of Puketapu, and opened fire on June 25, continuing until it was dark,” says Atareiria.

“By the end of the day, however, they had done very little damage. The bombardment was to continue, equally ineffectually, for a further two days.”

Despite the bombardment – and the fact that they were outnumbered almost 10 to one – the defenders weren’t exactly throwing in the towel.

“On July 1 a raiding party from the pā successfully overpowered Tāmati Wāka Nene’s camp and took the Union Jack that had been flying there,” says Atareiria.

“The Union Jack was then flown within the defenders’ pā in full view of the British – upside down and at half mast below a Kākahu (Māori cloak). Despard was apoplectic with rage at the insult.”

Goaded into action, he ordered the storming of the pā. Although Despard’s offices and allies warned against attacking the heavily defended pā – and Wāka Nene, who had since recaptured his territory from the defenders, refused to participate in the attack – Despard would not be dissuaded.

“The disastrous assault went ahead,” says Atareiria.

“The solid palisades of the inner fence had withstood the artillery attack and remained intact, preventing the British from entering the pā. Meanwhile, the firing trenches proved devastatingly effective against the attackers. Within seven minutes of the attack beginning, over 47 of the attackers lay dead with about 70 more injured. The attack was an unmitigated disaster.”

Although more ammunition was brought in, and the British continued shelling for a few more days, the result had been a foregone conclusion. By 8 July, the pā was found to have been abandoned and the defenders had disappeared into the night.

“Although he tried to put a positive spin on the result, Despard had achieved nothing at enormous cost,” says Atareiria.

“He was to experience similar frustration at Ruapekapeka, where he would be confronted once again by an almost impregnable pā.”

Today, remnants of Pene Taui’s pā can still be seen in some of the undulations in the ground, though the area is predominantly an urupā with Te Whare Karakia o Mikaere at its heart.

“In 1871, Heta Te Haara, who had succeeded Pene Taui as the local rangatira after his death, wrote to the government for permission to remove the remains of the troops from the original burial site to where they currently lie inside the St Michael’s churchyard,” says Atareiria.

“On July 1 1872 – 27 years to the day of the battle itself – the troops were honoured by Māori in a service that was attended by a Government official representing the Under Secretary of the then Native Department, who reported on ‘the present good feeling, singleness of purpose, and perfect unanimity which very apparently existed between the Ngapuhi and their Pakeha  neighbours’.”

The grandson of Heta Te Haara, kaumātua Ben Te Haara, remembers his grandfather talking about the battleground. His recollections were a vital part of the research as he was able to point out many features from information passed down to him – including the location of a line of pūriri trees that the British used to range their guns.

“The information that Ben Te Haara and other kaumātua provided has been invaluable in informing our Wāhi Tapu listing,” says Atareiria.

“The listing formally identifies the tapu nature of this place to Ngāti Rangi, while also highlighting the importance of this place to all New Zealanders.”

 

Box Story:

A masterpiece of military engineering

One of the observers of the battle of Ōhaeawai was missionary Henry Williams. His wife, Marianne Williams, commented on the ingenuity of the construction of the war pā in one of her writings:

“It is quite astonishing how they seem to defy the British in their fortifications. They have double fences, ditches, and loop holes, their houses sunk underground; and as the great guns of the British are fired through their pa with so little loss to the rebels, it is supposed that they have large holes, in which they secure themselves. The fence around the pa is covered between every paling with loose bunches of flax, against which the bullets fall and drop; in the night they repair every hole made by the guns.”

“WWII Northland heritage inventory achieves key milestone” HNZ Media Release

Jack Kemp (left) and Dr Bill Guthrie – ‘somewhere in Northland’ – enthusiastically uncovering and recording the little known places associated with Northland’s World War II defences.

June 29

MEDIA RELEASE

WWII Northland heritage inventory achieves key milestone

A research project to develop a heritage inventory of Northland’s World War II military places has achieved a crucial milestone.

Seventeen military camp sites associated with the defence of the Bay of Islands have been identified from official records and other sources, and information about them recorded. The work completes the initial phase of the inventory.

For Jack Kemp and Dr Bill Guthrie, volunteer researchers with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, the completion of the Bay of Islands component is an important first step.

“The Bay of Islands was an important part of what became Fortress Northland, and a central part of New Zealand’s defence strategy,” says Jack Kemp.

“Major General Harold Barrowclough, who headed divisional headquarters in Whangarei, had identified the Bay of Islands as the most likely place for the Japanese to land a main attack force, with simultaneous additional attacks at Whangaroa and Doubtless Bay a distinct possibility.”

Barrowclough had grimly predicted that – based on the defence that was in place in early 1942 – if the Japanese attacked the Whangaroa and Bay of Islands simultaneously at 7am, they would take both areas by lunchtime, and face only limited resistance on their road to Auckland. (more…)

“Alberton goes for Baroque” One Hour Concert 5pm HNZ Media Release

 

NZ Barok

June 22

MEDIA RELEASE

Alberton goes for Baroque

A selection of Baroque music will be performed at Alberton, the historic mansion cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga on July 29 (5pm).

Performed by NZ Barok, New Zealand’s only period instrument orchestra, Melody and Musings: A Baroque Parlour Concertwill feature masterpieces by composers like Purcell, Vivaldi and Bach, as well as some lesser-known musical treasures from the 18thCentury.

Using instruments and playing styles of the period, the musicians will perform the compositions much as they would have sounded several centuries ago, while breathing fresh life and vitality into the pieces.

“The one-hour concert has been put together with a general audience in mind, and it promises to be a light-hearted and extremely enjoyable sampler of some Baroque gems – complete with anecdotes from history,” says the Manager of Alberton, Rendell McIntosh.

“This is a great opportunity for people to enjoy some beautiful live music in a delightful heritage setting.”

Tickets: Adults - $30; children, seniors and Heritage New Zealand members - $20. Tickets include refreshments and house entry. To book, or for more information, Ph 09-846-7367.

For more information: www.alberton.co.nz

“Strengthening our national archives and libraries” Hon Grant Robertson MP Assoc Minister of Arts Culture and Heritage Media Release

Strengthening our national archives and libraries

A new programme of work is underway to strengthen the contribution our national archives and libraries can make to New Zealand’s culture and democracy, Internal Affairs Minister Tracey Martin and the Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Grant Robertson said on Wednesday.

“The National Library of New Zealand, Archives New Zealand and the audio-visual archive Ngā Taonga Sound and Vision have vital roles in our democratic and cultural infrastructure,” says Grant Robertson. (more…)