Mangungu Te Tiriti o Waitangi Commemorations – February 12 (2019)- HNZPT Media Release

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga is joining with Te Mana o Mangungu Hokianga Trust and Nga Uri Whakatupu o Hokianga to commemorate the anniversary of New Zealand’s largest signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi at Māngungu Mission on February 12.

Historically, the signing of the Treaty at Māngungu had a large impact on the community. About 70 rangatira gathered at the Mission and subsequently signed the Treaty, and between 2000 and 3000 Māori attended on the day. 

The original table on which Te Tiriti was signed is on display at Mangungu Mission, and this important artefact will play a central role in the commemorations.  

A display on Te Hokowhitu-a-Tu – the 28thMaori Battalion – will also feature in this year’s Tiriti event. 

(more…)

Heritage New Zealand properties open free on Waitangi Day – HNZPT Media Release (30:01:19)

Properties in Northland cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga will once again open their doors to the public free of charge on Waitangi Day.

The historic places include Pompallier Mission (Russell), Kemp House and the Stone Store (Kerikeri), Te Waimate Mission (Waimate North), Mangungu Mission (Horeke) and Clendon House (Rawene). 

The country’s lead heritage organisation cares for these properties on behalf of all New Zealanders, and the free entry is its way to help commemorate and reflect on our national day.  This year’s main theme will be ‘the building of a nation’.

“This theme relates to our built heritage as representative of what preceded the 1840 signing and what dated it,” says Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Chief Executive Andrew Coleman.

“They are physical reminders, or touchstones, of Māori and Pākehāinteraction; of who we are, where we have come from and where we will collectively go as New Zealanders.

“Our properties tell a small part of a wider story of the nation.  They are open free of charge to enjoy, learn from and appreciate a snapshot of our history. 

“The objective of the open day is to promote the significance of Heritage New Zealand places that contribute to the story of early Māori and Pākehāinteraction and the progression to the multicultural society we are today in a family, fun and inclusive way,” says Andrew.

The open day is part of Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga’s commitment to honouring the vision for Māori heritage as contained in the Māori Heritage Council’s document Tapuwae.

“Tapuwae means ‘sacred footprint’.  The purpose of the document, and the properties opening, is to further express the idea that we can look back to see where we have been as we move forward, taking more steps,” says Andrew.

“It’s a day of commemoration and reflection.  We hope all New Zealanders take the opportunity to visit one or more of these special places.”

For more information please visit www.heritage.org.nz

Picture Postcard competition at Heritage New Zealand properties (Heritge New Zeland Media Release)

December 24

MEDIA RELEASE

Picture Postcard competition at Heritage New Zealand properties

Visitors to Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga’s properties in Northlandcould be in to win some special prizes in a photo competition running over the holiday break. 

From Boxing Day, Heritage New Zealand will run a ‘Picture Postcards’ series of Facebook posts celebrating some of the cool properties Heritage New Zealand cares for on behalf of all Kiwis.

Punters can drop a photo into any of the ‘Picture Postcards’ posts of them and their family and friends at one of Heritage New Zealand’s properties and go in the draw to win a copy of Landmarks – notable historic buildings of New Zealandby David McGill and Grant Sheehan.  

A copy of the book will be up for grabs with each post, and people are encouraged to get their friends to vote for their photo. At the end of the series the best overall photo will win a special prize.

Photos can be of any of Heritage New Zealand’s properties, not just from the daily post.  For more information on properties please visit http://www.heritage.org.nz/places/places-to-visit

Properties in Northland cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga are Kemp House / Stone Store, Te Waimate Mission, Pompallier Mission, Clendon House and Mangungu Mission. 

“Heritage role just like coming home for Ohaeawai resident” HNZ Media Release (28-02-18)

Heritage New Zealand’s Property Lead, Te Waimate and Hokianga Properties Alex Bell preparing a spit roast Hogget for the recent Waitangi Day cricket match at Te Waimate Mission. All in a day’s work – Alex’s third day of work actually.

February 28

MEDIA RELEASE

Heritage role just like coming home for Ohaeawai resident

For Ohaeawai resident Alex Bell, taking on a new role with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga is a bit like coming home.

The 31-year old was recently appointed Heritage New Zealand’s Property Lead, Te Waimate and Hokianga Properties;  a role that involves the management of New Zealand’s second oldest surviving building – Te Waimate Mission – as well as Mangungu Mission in Horeke and Clendon House in Rawene.

Alex has a particularly strong link to Clendon House.

“Dennis Cochrane, who was the father of Jane Clendon, was one of my ancestors. Jane, who married James Reddy Clendon, was instrumental in keeping Clendon House in the family after his death until it was eventually gifted to the NZ Historic Places Trust in the early 1970s,” says Alex.

“Besides that link, I grew up on a dairy farm near Lake Omapere and went to Okaihau Primary and College. Both sides of my family are long-time Northlanders with a good mix of 19thCentury links to the Hokianga, Bay of Islands and Whangarei.”

Discovering physical evidence of his ancestors on family land as a child was instrumental in forming an interest in history according to Alex.

“The objects I found poking out of the banks of the Hokianga Harbour were likely disposed of by them, so those old spoons and whiskey bottles created a more personal link between them and now,” he says.

Highlighting links that help bring history alive, as well as making stories and information accessible to the community, are objectives Alex wants to explore in his new role.

“I love to get into the gritty parts of the stories, and to find historical tidbits to incorporate into the story of a property or archaeological site that give it some personal context,” he says.

“Heritage New Zealand’s Hokianga properties were all established in the early phases of European settlement and are all Landmarks Whenua Tohunga. As well as travelling half way around the world, settlers had to build their lives in an unfamiliar nation, build relationships with a well established Maori population, and build the foundations of Missionary societies from which they had been sent – all while staying alive.”

Each of the physical buildings sit in landscapes that incorporate centuries of Maori settlement and politics, and have their own stories to tell.

“Te Waimate Mission is an untapped treasure – and that goes for Mangungu Mission and Clendon House too. There is a wealth of stories to be told beyond just those of key historical figures,” he says.

“They’re also beautiful places to enjoy. Te Waimate Mission, for example, is perfect for people to bring a picnic and sit under the trees.”

Te Waimate is a far cry from Western Australia where Alex worked as a contract archaeologist prior to returning to New Zealand. He is enjoying being able to walk through knee-deep grass without having to worry about standing on a sleeping snake, or surveying in the bush and getting covered in kangaroo ticks. Neither does he miss being away for weeks at a time, the relentless heat and sleeping in a swag by the fire.

“I certainly loved it there, though. A beer at sunset with your mates after a 10-hour work day in 45 degree heat, looking over a mountain range of premium grade iron ore – that’s the good life,” he says.

After working as an archaeologist in the north following his return from Australia, Alex is looking forward to the next step of his heritage journey. And his family connections make it all the more personal.

“One of my ancestors, William Robinson, is buried in the Mangungu cemetery – so this job is kind of like caretaking a bit of family history I suppose,” he says.

 

 

“Northern Wars Tour” 10am Saturday 3rd November – Heritage Northland Media Release

 

 

 

October 25

MEDIA RELEASE

Northern Wars Tour

Heritage Northland Inc will host a trip to visit the three Northern Wars battle sites of Te Ahuahu, Puketutu and Ohaeawai On Saturday 3 November.

The trip will start from the Te Waimate Mission Grounds at 10 amwhere Morning Tea will be served from the Sunday School Hall from 9.30am. A briefing will be given outlining the trip and the events of the Northern Wars, and the bus will then depart for Te Ahuahu and Puketutu and finally the Ohaeawai Pa site. On-board and site commentary will be provided by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga staff.

A ‘picnic style’ lunch will then be served back at Te Waimate Mission around 12.30pm.

Following lunch break, the Te Waimate Mission Building and grounds will be open for people to explore including the adjacent St John the Baptist Church and graveyard. Afternoon tea will be available from 2.45pm.

The cost is $45 per person and includes transport, morning/afternoon teas and lunch. Parking is available at Te Waimate Mission grounds situated at 344 Te Ahu Ahu Road, Waimate North.  Toilet facilities are available in the grounds of Te Waimate Mission site.

Participants will visit privately owned properties, and with parking limited, no individual transport will be allowed.

Bookings essential – contact Merle Newlove on Ph 09 439 7492 or email: m.r.newlove@xtra.co.nz   for further details.

“Celebrate Suffrage 125″ at Clendon House” 9.30am-4pm November 24th ( HNZ Media Release)

Artist Janet de Wagt in action at the first community suffrage art workshop held in Auckland last month. (Source HNZ Media Release)

October 26

MEDIA RELEASE

Celebrate Suffrage 125 at Clendon House

A community art workshop commemorating 125 years of women’s suffrage will take place at Clendon House in Rawene on November 24 (9.30am-4pm).

The art workshop will be led by Dunedin artist Janet de Wagt, and is funded by a Creative New Zealand Grant, with support from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.

Participants will create a commemorative banner that will be joined with other banners made in other workshops at key heritage locations around the country over the next few months.

The banners from the art workshops will be amalgamated into one final artwork which will be launched at Old Government Buildings in Wellington in April next year.

“The banners are a reference to the three Parliamentary petitions that were circulated around the country and which ultimately resulted in women finally being granted the right to vote on 19 September 1893,” says Lindsay Charman, who is the Senior Visitor Host for Clendon House, which is cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.

“The third petition was described by suffragist Kate Sheppard as a “monster petition” made up of petition sheets circulated throughout New Zealand, and returned to Christchurch where Sheppard pasted each sheet end on end and rolled it around a section of a broom handle.”

The ‘Monster Petition’ survives, and contains 25,519 signatures – including some men. The roll was presented to Parliament with great drama. Sir John Hall, Member of Parliament and suffrage supporter, brought it into the House and unrolled it down the central aisle of the debating chamber until it hit the end wall with a thud.

“The banners will be an artistic representation of that extraordinary social movement that ultimately saw New Zealand becoming the first country in the world to grant women the right to vote,” he says.

Clendon House is a fitting venue for the workshops according to Lindsay. Jane Clendon – the daughter of Dennis Cochrane and his wife Takotowi from the Hokianga – was a woman of considerable strength.

“She also had significant blood lines and mana – though she found herself almost bankrupt with a large family to provide for after the death of her husband in 1872. Many people facing such pressure would have gone under, but Jane – who was only 34 years old with eight children under 17 – rode to Auckland on horseback and managed to skilfully negotiate terms of repayment with her creditors,” he says.

“The story of how Jane managed to clear her debts, educate her children in both the Pakeha and Maori worlds while keeping the family home is inspiring. She was a young mother who took charge of her life in a crisis.”

Artistic ability is not necessary for people to take part in the workshops – and Janet de Wagt is looking forward to working with a range of different ideas and skills. All art materials are provided for at the workshop.

“Participants in the banner-making will be able to use painting, printing, stamping, drawing and weaving – whatever they prefer – to create the banners,”  says Lindsay.

“Participation is the important thing – and celebrating a movement that changed New Zealand and the world forever.”

(Pompallier Mission) “Bowl remnants found in the mix” Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Media Release

 

Lindis Capper-Starr of the Kerikeri Mission Station and James Robinson compare a Mason and Cash mixing bowl from today with remnants of a similar mixing bowl from over a hundred years ago.

 

 

 

October 9

MEDIA RELEASE

Bowl remnants found in the mix

An archaeological excavation as part of earthworks associated with a new sprinkler system for Pompallier Mission has uncovered evidence of some delicious baking.

Remnants of a ceramic mixing bowl, understood to be manufactured in the 1800s by British ceramic firm Mason – the fore runner of today’s Mason and Cash – were discovered as part of the recent excavation that took place adjacent to Russell’s Pompallier Mission.

The historic property is cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.

“The excavation was carried out as part of the conditions of an archaeological authority which was granted for earthworks associated with the new sprinkler,” says Heritage New Zealand’s Northland Archaeologist, James Robinson.

“This area was identified as potentially having archaeological features present, and the authority process enabled it to be excavated carefully as part of earthworks for the sprinkler system. The bowl, bottles and other items were found in a rubbish dump that was part of the excavation area.”

“Dating and analysing the function of these items can provide us with good evidence of what was going on at this site many years ago.”

Because the property has been in continuous use, it is not completely clear what period the bowl dates from, though initial analysis suggests the bowl could date back to the 1800s. It’s likely that the bowl broke – perhaps while the owner was whipping up a batch of pikelets, or a similar delicacy – and the bits duly chucked into the rubbish heap.

The mixing bowls are not exactly rare – though they have a special connection to another historic property that Heritage New Zealand cares for according to James.

“Mason Cash and Co replaced the Mason brand in 1901, and Mason and Cash is still going strong. Mixing bowls almost identical to the one that was discarded in Russell all those years ago, are on sale at the Stone Store along with a range of other authentic trade goods from the 19thCentury,” he says.

“There’s a nice continuity there.”

Manager of the Stone Store, Liz Bigwood, agrees.

“We love selling products with brands that have endured for years, and Mason and Cash is definitely one of those,” she says.

“Mason and Cash still make the classic cane-coloured mixing bowl, as well as new designs that are more contemporary and funky. The brand is still very much alive – even after over two centuries.”

Installation of Pompallier Mission’s sprinkler system is expected to be completed by summer.

Christmas Cheer At Pompallier Mission On Saturday December 23 At 6pm. (2017)

 

 

 

December 4

MEDIA RELEASE

Christmas cheer at Pompallier Mission                                               

Christmas cheer will be coming to Russell once again this year at the annual Carols @ Pompallier concert at Pompallier Mission, the Heritage New Zealand property in Russell, Bay of Islands.

Every Christmas, Pompallier Mission and New Zealand’s oldest church, Russell’s Christ Church, come together to host community carols for locals and visitors alike. Local groups and soloists will perform traditional festive favourites as well as modern Christmas songs as part of the show, which takes place on Saturday December 23 at 6pm.

Concert-goers will also have the opportunity to sing along to some favourite Christmas Carols.

Carols @ Pompallier is an annual fixture for the Russell community and is a great way for the community to re-connect and kick off the festive season,” says the Manager of Pompallier Mission, Scott Elliffe.

People are invited to bring a picnic, rug and good cheer.

“Pompallier Mission has the only public gardens in Russell, so it’s a great opportunity for families to enjoy a very pleasant evening of festive entertainment in this beautiful historic setting,” says Scott.

Admission to Carols @ Pompallier is free to everybody. (Alternative wet weather venue – Christ Church in Russell).

Media Contact: Scott Elliffe, Ph 09-403-9015

“Northland’s WWII military spots to be recorded” Heritage New Zealand Media Release (2017)

October 20

MEDIA RELEASE

Northland’s WWII military spots to be recorded

Two Northland volunteer researchers are banding together to undertake a heritage inventory identifying places in Northland associated with World War II.

Jack Kemp of Kerikeri and Dr Bill Guthrie of Doubtless Bay have had a long fascination with the strong military presence that was stationed in Northland during the conflict, and are undertaking an inventory of military camps and other sites before they are lost.

“During the early 1940s there was a proliferation of military camps in Northland associated with the US Marines who were going to be sent to fight in the Pacific,” says Heritage New Zealand’s Northland Manager, Bill Edwards.

“The people associated with these camps have mostly passed on and the collective memory of these camps is disappearing. Evidence of these places is also often quite ephemeral – so it’s important to record them now.”

Jack has been involved at Santo with the proposed WWII museum there, while Bill Guthrie is a former professor at the University of Macau whose Father-in-law was a bomber pilot at Guadalcanal and whose father served in the Medical Corps.

Athough it’s still early days for the project, some of the initial research undertaken by Jack has already paid off.

“We were recently advised of a new subdivision planned for west of Kamo near Whangarei. We cross-checked against information that had already been gathered on the area and it turns out that the subdivision will be built on the site of what was the C1 Marine camp,” he says.

“The story of the Marines in Northland is not particularly well known, so this provides an opportunity to mark the history of the area through street names and possibly interpretation so that people will be able to understand the story of what went on here over 70 years ago, and the enormous impact that had on our history.”

The two volunteers are starting with military camps, though the inventory is likely to expand to include other World War II sites in Northland including airfields, bunkers and gun emplacements.

“The history of the Second World War is relatively recent, though in some ways that makes it all the more vulnerable to loss. We can’t take it for granted, and instead have to be proactive and record as much information as we can about this important part of our heritage,” says Bill.

“This project is timely and important.”

Anybody with any information about military bases in Northland during World War II, or other related information, can contact Bill Edwards on bedwards@heritage.org.nz or Ph 09-407-0471.

“Have your say on Mangungu Mission….” Close Off Date 4pm On Friday 24 August 2018.

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga is seeking feedback on its draft conservation plan for the Mangungu Mission House at Horeke.

 

 

 

July 13

MEDIA RELEASE

Have your say on Mangungu Mission….

People can now have their say on the future care of one of Northland’s most important historic places.

A conservation plan for Mangungu Mission – the site of the Wesleyan Mission that was established in 1828, and which later became the site of the largest signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the place where honey bees were first introduced into New Zealand – is now available for people to give feedback.

The process will be overseen by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga which manages the Category 1 historic place, and will include public meetings at Kohukohu, Rawene and Horeke.

“The purpose of the plan is to provide guidance on the care and management of the Mission House, and to protect and conserve its cultural heritage significance for future generations,” says Heritage New Zealand’s Property Lead Hokianga Properties, Alex Bell.

“Thanks to the success of the new cycleway, Mangungu Mission is no longer the quiet backwater it may have been five years ago. It’s increasingly becoming a tourism destination in its own right, and is also one of Northland’s Landmarks Whenua Tohunga.

“It’s important that we care for and maintain this very important building well, and that means getting the conservation plan right – because ultimately the plan will guide us on things like maintenance and restoration as well as interpretation, and even promotion of Mangungu Mission.”

Hokianga iwi and hapu have a close connection to Mangungu Mission, and the original signing of the Treaty in the Hokianga on February 12 1840 is commemorated by the community every year. The Mangungu signing of 1840 drew about 3000 people on the day, with about 70 rangatira signing Te Tiriti after a period of rigorous debate.

“Many people feel a strong connection to Mangungu for its Tiriti and mission history, and we would like to hear from anybody who has an interest in this place to find out their stories and associations, and why the place is important to them,” says Alex.

“The information we collect during this process will help inform the conservation plan.”

The primary focus of the plan is the mission house itself, which has had a fascinating history. Originally constructed in 1839, it is one of this country’s oldest buildings.

“Amazingly, the house was shipped down to Onehunga in Auckland where it was used as a parsonage and home. It was then trucked back up to Mangungu where it was reassembled on the original site of the mission in 1972,” says Alex.

“Even though it has been shifted, the house has important heritage fabric and values, reflecting the story of early contact between Maori and Europeans, the introduction of Christianity and, of course, Te Tiriti.”

Once consultation has been completed, comments received will be evaluated and written into the plan as appropriate. The plan will then be presented to the Heritage New Zealand Board and Maori Heritage Council for approval prior to being adopted and implemented.

As well as the public meetings, people are also able to lodge written comments about the plan to be received by Heritage New Zealand no later than (4.00pm) August 24, 2018.

“Everyone who has an interest in Mangungu Mission is invited to the meetings or to make a submission,” says Alex.

“Mangungu is important to a lot of people, and we want to ensure the Conservation Plan is the best it can be.”

The draft conservation plan has been publicly notified and is available on the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga website http://www.heritage.org.nz/protecting-heritage/consulting-on

A reference copy will be also available at the meetings as well as in the Northland Area office (62 Kerikeri Road, Kerikeri).

Please send your written comments to the following address by 4pm on Friday 24 August 2018.

Calum Maclean
Policy Advisor Kaitohutohu Kaupapa Here
Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga
PO Box 2629
Wellington 6140.

email: cmaclean@heritage.org.nz.