Tauranga archaeology to feature in NZ Archaeology Week (HNZPT Media Release 17.04.2019)

Bay of Plenty archaeologist, Ken Phillips (HNZPT Media Release)

April 17

MEDIA RELEASE

Tauranga archaeology to feature in NZ Archaeology Week

The spotlight will fall on Tauranga’s unique archaeology in two major events taking place in May. 

The events are part of the third annual NZ Archaeology Week – a nationwide celebration of New Zealand’s archaeological heritage which runs from April 24 to May 5. 

People can kick off their exploration of Tauranga’s archaeology by joining well-known Bay of Plenty archaeologist and heritage consultant, Ken Phillips, who will talk about the archaeology of early Te Papa including Otamataha pa – an important site in the history of Tauranga. 

Ken discovered the remains of a trench that runs through the Otamataha pa and will talk about the archaeology of the pa and the surrounding landscape. The public talk is a great opportunity to hear from an archaeologist who has researched, surveyed and investigated this area.

Join Ken Phillips in the Rose Garden (Robbins Park, Cliff Road, Tauranga) at 12.30pm on Thursday May 2 (Bookings not required). 

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On May 3 Brigid Gallagher – local archaeologist, conservator and presenter on the British TV series Time Teamand host of the New Zealand Choice TV documentary series Heritage Rescue– will present a talk entitled Buried: Life Below the Streets of Tauranga

Brigid, who has directed a number of excavations in Tauranga’s central business district, will focus on the archaeology of the central city – including the site of the Tauranga Hotel (now the Lone Star). 

Brigid Gallagher will speak at the Council Chambers on Friday May 3 at 6pm.

To book for Brigid’s talk, follow the link: 

https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/brigid-gallagher-buried-life-below-the-streets-of-tauranga-tickets-59804892042

For more information on either event contact Heritage New Zealand’s Lower Northern office in Tauranga – Ph 07-577-4530 or email infolowernorthern@heritage.org.nz

“Walk and Talks to focus on Northland Archaeology” (HNZPT Media Release 17.04.2017)

April 17

MEDIA RELEASE

Walk and Talks to focus on Northland Archaeology

The spotlight will fall on Northland’s archaeology in two major events taking place in Whangarei on Saturday May 4. 

The events are part of the third annual NZ Archaeology Week – a nationwide celebration of New Zealand’s archaeological heritage which runs from April 24 to May 5. 

People can kick off their exploration of Northland archaeology with the Hatea River Hikoi– a walk ‘n’ talk led by students from Whangarei Boys High School with back-up from Heritage New Zealand’s Northland Manager, Bill Edwards. 

“Students will share what they have learned about the archaeological features of the area,” says Bill Edwards. 

“The features are quite stunning, and include early gardening and habitations, while illustrating how people have changed the landscape over the centuries. It has a very dynamic heritage story, and that’s part of what makes it really exciting. 

“This archaeological landscape is also very close to Whangarei’s CBD which is actually quite a rare thing in an urban setting.”

People interested in enjoying the free walk can gather at Hatea Drive opposite the Discovery Settlers Motel before the walk begins at 10am (look for the flagpole marking the meeting place).

Later that day, a panel of experts will present six talks focusing on different aspects of archaeology at the KiwiNorth Floor Talks, which will take place at 2pm on May 4. Each talk will be about 15 minutes long, including time for questions and answers. The talks will take place at the Vintage Car Club rooms at KiwiNorth (Admission $5 per person).

Floor Talk topics include: 

  • Korero Around Sources of Obsidian found in the Bay of IslandJohn and Webber Booth
  • WWII Camps in Northland- Jack Kemp and Dr Bill Guthrie
  • ‘Tākou - Red Earth, the Whenua in the Rohe of Hapū Ngāti Rēhia, Bay of Islands, Northland, NZ’  - Chris Booth
  • Evidence for Early Polynesian Voyaging to New Zealand- Ross and Gael Ramsay, Grahame Collett, Georgia Kerby
  • The Battle of Kororāreka – the start of the Northern Wars- Bill Edwards

Sharing of knowledge leads to ‘rediscovery’ of mission building (HNZ Media Release 18.03.2019)

Skinner descendants at Waima (HNZPT Media Release)

March 18

MEDIA RELEASE

Sharing of knowledge leads to ‘rediscovery’ of mission building

An important early building associated with the Wesleyan Mission in Waima has been ‘rediscovered’.

Waikaramihi, the historic church originally associated with the Hokianga mission, has been noted at its ‘new’ home – Tuhirangi Marae – over 30 years after it was relocated.

“Built in 1853, the church has been shifted twice in its history,” says Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Northland Manager, Bill Edwards.

“The church originally served the community at the Waima mission located up the Taheke River. The church was then moved closer to the Waima settlement in 1893, before its second relocation to the marae in 1988. We now know that the mission included the church building and school building, making the site more complex than what was depicted in early paintings.”

Knowledge of the church’s background came to light at the recent Te Tiriti o Waitangi celebrations at Mangungu Mission, commemorating the 179thanniversary of the third and largest Treaty signings that took place at the other main Wesleyan mission in the Hokianga based at Horeke.

Descendants of missionary Thomas Skinner who was stationed at Waima – a settlement that would eventually grow into a thriving economy based on farming and forestry – shared information about the church building with Heritage New Zealand staff at the event. They also talked about their discovery of a memorial stone celebrating the old oak which missionary John Warren planted in 1839.

“We were actually in the Hokianga to try to find the grave of Thomas Skinner, who died at the Mission in 1866 at the untimely age of 45,” says Thomas Skinner descendant, Tricia Rossiter.

“The family story held that he was buried near the Mission Oak at Waima so we went there to look for his grave. However, after prodding and poking in the long kikuyu around the fallen oak at the Waima site, one of the group found a plaque commemorating the tree, along with the date it was planted and acknowledgement of Rev John Warren as ‘the first missionary in Waima’.

“The stone had fallen off its plinth and was completely hidden under dense grass, though the writing on the stone was still quite legible.”

 

Historic photo highlights reality of Fortress Northland

HMNZS Killegray (Source Heritage New Zealand)

April 24

MEDIA RELEASE

Historic photo highlights reality of Fortress Northland

A striking photograph that serves as a reminder of Northland’s importance as a first line of defence against enemy invasion during World War II has surfaced as a result of a heritage inventory being undertaken by two Northland volunteers.

Jack Kemp and Dr Bill Guthrie, who have spent almost two years identifying and recording military places associated with World War II in Northland as volunteer researchers for Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, discovered the image while carrying out interviews with people who served in Northland during the War and their descendants.

One of the interviewees, Kevin Hall, is a collector of photos associated with the history of the Far North – including the black and white photo of HMNZS Killegrayclearing sea mines in the Bay of Islands.

“There’s something quite confronting about this picture which captures these deadly mines bobbing in the water, with the Bay of Islands’ distinctive Ninepin Rock – or Tikitiki – on the horizon,” says Heritage New Zealand’s Northland Manager, Bill Edwards.

“It’s a seascape loved by thousands of visitors – and yet here we see a bunch of mines floating in the water where many of us enjoy recreational water activities today. It’s a stark reminder that Northland was a fortress on high alert against attack after the bombing of Pearl Harbour.”

The photo was taken by Tudor Collins, who served as a petty officer in the Royal New Zealand Navy during the war. Prior to this, Collins had developed a reputation as a noted freelance who was one of the first photographers in Napier after the Hawke’s Bay earthquake of 1931. He also recorded Auckland’s Queen Street riots in 1932, and was the only photographer to meet the passengers and crew from the mined Niagrain June 1940.

“Despite the military purpose of Collins’ photo, it’s as much an example of New Zealand social history as his pre-war work,” says Bill. 

The mines depicted may have been part of a network of 13 loops of 16 contact mines in the channel between Moturoa and Moturua Islands, or more likely some of the 258 contact mines laid in three lines between Ninepin Rock and Whale Rock.

Further north, the Whangaroa Harbour was protected from seaborne invasion by a line of 30 mines across the entrance to the harbour which would have been activated from a Controlled Mining Station.

Mangungu Te Tiriti o Waitangi Commemorations – February 12 (2019)- HNZPT Media Release

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga is joining with Te Mana o Mangungu Hokianga Trust and Nga Uri Whakatupu o Hokianga to commemorate the anniversary of New Zealand’s largest signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi at Māngungu Mission on February 12.

Historically, the signing of the Treaty at Māngungu had a large impact on the community. About 70 rangatira gathered at the Mission and subsequently signed the Treaty, and between 2000 and 3000 Māori attended on the day. 

The original table on which Te Tiriti was signed is on display at Mangungu Mission, and this important artefact will play a central role in the commemorations.  

A display on Te Hokowhitu-a-Tu – the 28thMaori Battalion – will also feature in this year’s Tiriti event. 

(more…)

Heritage New Zealand properties open free on Waitangi Day – HNZPT Media Release (30:01:19)

Properties in Northland cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga will once again open their doors to the public free of charge on Waitangi Day.

The historic places include Pompallier Mission (Russell), Kemp House and the Stone Store (Kerikeri), Te Waimate Mission (Waimate North), Mangungu Mission (Horeke) and Clendon House (Rawene). 

The country’s lead heritage organisation cares for these properties on behalf of all New Zealanders, and the free entry is its way to help commemorate and reflect on our national day.  This year’s main theme will be ‘the building of a nation’.

“This theme relates to our built heritage as representative of what preceded the 1840 signing and what dated it,” says Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Chief Executive Andrew Coleman.

“They are physical reminders, or touchstones, of Māori and Pākehāinteraction; of who we are, where we have come from and where we will collectively go as New Zealanders.

“Our properties tell a small part of a wider story of the nation.  They are open free of charge to enjoy, learn from and appreciate a snapshot of our history. 

“The objective of the open day is to promote the significance of Heritage New Zealand places that contribute to the story of early Māori and Pākehāinteraction and the progression to the multicultural society we are today in a family, fun and inclusive way,” says Andrew.

The open day is part of Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga’s commitment to honouring the vision for Māori heritage as contained in the Māori Heritage Council’s document Tapuwae.

“Tapuwae means ‘sacred footprint’.  The purpose of the document, and the properties opening, is to further express the idea that we can look back to see where we have been as we move forward, taking more steps,” says Andrew.

“It’s a day of commemoration and reflection.  We hope all New Zealanders take the opportunity to visit one or more of these special places.”

For more information please visit www.heritage.org.nz

Picture Postcard competition at Heritage New Zealand properties (Heritge New Zeland Media Release)

December 24

MEDIA RELEASE

Picture Postcard competition at Heritage New Zealand properties

Visitors to Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga’s properties in Northlandcould be in to win some special prizes in a photo competition running over the holiday break. 

From Boxing Day, Heritage New Zealand will run a ‘Picture Postcards’ series of Facebook posts celebrating some of the cool properties Heritage New Zealand cares for on behalf of all Kiwis.

Punters can drop a photo into any of the ‘Picture Postcards’ posts of them and their family and friends at one of Heritage New Zealand’s properties and go in the draw to win a copy of Landmarks – notable historic buildings of New Zealandby David McGill and Grant Sheehan.  

A copy of the book will be up for grabs with each post, and people are encouraged to get their friends to vote for their photo. At the end of the series the best overall photo will win a special prize.

Photos can be of any of Heritage New Zealand’s properties, not just from the daily post.  For more information on properties please visit http://www.heritage.org.nz/places/places-to-visit

Properties in Northland cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga are Kemp House / Stone Store, Te Waimate Mission, Pompallier Mission, Clendon House and Mangungu Mission. 

“Heritage role just like coming home for Ohaeawai resident” HNZ Media Release (28-02-18)

Heritage New Zealand’s Property Lead, Te Waimate and Hokianga Properties Alex Bell preparing a spit roast Hogget for the recent Waitangi Day cricket match at Te Waimate Mission. All in a day’s work – Alex’s third day of work actually.

February 28

MEDIA RELEASE

Heritage role just like coming home for Ohaeawai resident

For Ohaeawai resident Alex Bell, taking on a new role with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga is a bit like coming home.

The 31-year old was recently appointed Heritage New Zealand’s Property Lead, Te Waimate and Hokianga Properties;  a role that involves the management of New Zealand’s second oldest surviving building – Te Waimate Mission – as well as Mangungu Mission in Horeke and Clendon House in Rawene.

Alex has a particularly strong link to Clendon House.

“Dennis Cochrane, who was the father of Jane Clendon, was one of my ancestors. Jane, who married James Reddy Clendon, was instrumental in keeping Clendon House in the family after his death until it was eventually gifted to the NZ Historic Places Trust in the early 1970s,” says Alex.

“Besides that link, I grew up on a dairy farm near Lake Omapere and went to Okaihau Primary and College. Both sides of my family are long-time Northlanders with a good mix of 19thCentury links to the Hokianga, Bay of Islands and Whangarei.”

Discovering physical evidence of his ancestors on family land as a child was instrumental in forming an interest in history according to Alex.

“The objects I found poking out of the banks of the Hokianga Harbour were likely disposed of by them, so those old spoons and whiskey bottles created a more personal link between them and now,” he says.

Highlighting links that help bring history alive, as well as making stories and information accessible to the community, are objectives Alex wants to explore in his new role.

“I love to get into the gritty parts of the stories, and to find historical tidbits to incorporate into the story of a property or archaeological site that give it some personal context,” he says.

“Heritage New Zealand’s Hokianga properties were all established in the early phases of European settlement and are all Landmarks Whenua Tohunga. As well as travelling half way around the world, settlers had to build their lives in an unfamiliar nation, build relationships with a well established Maori population, and build the foundations of Missionary societies from which they had been sent – all while staying alive.”

Each of the physical buildings sit in landscapes that incorporate centuries of Maori settlement and politics, and have their own stories to tell.

“Te Waimate Mission is an untapped treasure – and that goes for Mangungu Mission and Clendon House too. There is a wealth of stories to be told beyond just those of key historical figures,” he says.

“They’re also beautiful places to enjoy. Te Waimate Mission, for example, is perfect for people to bring a picnic and sit under the trees.”

Te Waimate is a far cry from Western Australia where Alex worked as a contract archaeologist prior to returning to New Zealand. He is enjoying being able to walk through knee-deep grass without having to worry about standing on a sleeping snake, or surveying in the bush and getting covered in kangaroo ticks. Neither does he miss being away for weeks at a time, the relentless heat and sleeping in a swag by the fire.

“I certainly loved it there, though. A beer at sunset with your mates after a 10-hour work day in 45 degree heat, looking over a mountain range of premium grade iron ore – that’s the good life,” he says.

After working as an archaeologist in the north following his return from Australia, Alex is looking forward to the next step of his heritage journey. And his family connections make it all the more personal.

“One of my ancestors, William Robinson, is buried in the Mangungu cemetery – so this job is kind of like caretaking a bit of family history I suppose,” he says.

 

 

“Northern Wars Tour” 10am Saturday 3rd November – Heritage Northland Media Release

 

 

 

October 25

MEDIA RELEASE

Northern Wars Tour

Heritage Northland Inc will host a trip to visit the three Northern Wars battle sites of Te Ahuahu, Puketutu and Ohaeawai On Saturday 3 November.

The trip will start from the Te Waimate Mission Grounds at 10 amwhere Morning Tea will be served from the Sunday School Hall from 9.30am. A briefing will be given outlining the trip and the events of the Northern Wars, and the bus will then depart for Te Ahuahu and Puketutu and finally the Ohaeawai Pa site. On-board and site commentary will be provided by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga staff.

A ‘picnic style’ lunch will then be served back at Te Waimate Mission around 12.30pm.

Following lunch break, the Te Waimate Mission Building and grounds will be open for people to explore including the adjacent St John the Baptist Church and graveyard. Afternoon tea will be available from 2.45pm.

The cost is $45 per person and includes transport, morning/afternoon teas and lunch. Parking is available at Te Waimate Mission grounds situated at 344 Te Ahu Ahu Road, Waimate North.  Toilet facilities are available in the grounds of Te Waimate Mission site.

Participants will visit privately owned properties, and with parking limited, no individual transport will be allowed.

Bookings essential – contact Merle Newlove on Ph 09 439 7492 or email: m.r.newlove@xtra.co.nz   for further details.

“Celebrate Suffrage 125″ at Clendon House” 9.30am-4pm November 24th ( HNZ Media Release)

Artist Janet de Wagt in action at the first community suffrage art workshop held in Auckland last month. (Source HNZ Media Release)

October 26

MEDIA RELEASE

Celebrate Suffrage 125 at Clendon House

A community art workshop commemorating 125 years of women’s suffrage will take place at Clendon House in Rawene on November 24 (9.30am-4pm).

The art workshop will be led by Dunedin artist Janet de Wagt, and is funded by a Creative New Zealand Grant, with support from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.

Participants will create a commemorative banner that will be joined with other banners made in other workshops at key heritage locations around the country over the next few months.

The banners from the art workshops will be amalgamated into one final artwork which will be launched at Old Government Buildings in Wellington in April next year.

“The banners are a reference to the three Parliamentary petitions that were circulated around the country and which ultimately resulted in women finally being granted the right to vote on 19 September 1893,” says Lindsay Charman, who is the Senior Visitor Host for Clendon House, which is cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.

“The third petition was described by suffragist Kate Sheppard as a “monster petition” made up of petition sheets circulated throughout New Zealand, and returned to Christchurch where Sheppard pasted each sheet end on end and rolled it around a section of a broom handle.”

The ‘Monster Petition’ survives, and contains 25,519 signatures – including some men. The roll was presented to Parliament with great drama. Sir John Hall, Member of Parliament and suffrage supporter, brought it into the House and unrolled it down the central aisle of the debating chamber until it hit the end wall with a thud.

“The banners will be an artistic representation of that extraordinary social movement that ultimately saw New Zealand becoming the first country in the world to grant women the right to vote,” he says.

Clendon House is a fitting venue for the workshops according to Lindsay. Jane Clendon – the daughter of Dennis Cochrane and his wife Takotowi from the Hokianga – was a woman of considerable strength.

“She also had significant blood lines and mana – though she found herself almost bankrupt with a large family to provide for after the death of her husband in 1872. Many people facing such pressure would have gone under, but Jane – who was only 34 years old with eight children under 17 – rode to Auckland on horseback and managed to skilfully negotiate terms of repayment with her creditors,” he says.

“The story of how Jane managed to clear her debts, educate her children in both the Pakeha and Maori worlds while keeping the family home is inspiring. She was a young mother who took charge of her life in a crisis.”

Artistic ability is not necessary for people to take part in the workshops – and Janet de Wagt is looking forward to working with a range of different ideas and skills. All art materials are provided for at the workshop.

“Participants in the banner-making will be able to use painting, printing, stamping, drawing and weaving – whatever they prefer – to create the banners,”  says Lindsay.

“Participation is the important thing – and celebrating a movement that changed New Zealand and the world forever.”