“Butler descendants visit Kerikeri” HNZPT Media Release

(Left to right) Douglas Barton, Rev Dr Kirsten Griffiths and Tim Ritchie at St James Church. 

Butler descendants visit Kerikeri

Descendants of Rev John Gare Butler – New Zealand’s first resident ordained missionary who served as the founding Superintendent of the Kerikeri Mission – paid a visit to Kerikeri recently to celebrate the bicentenary of the Butler family’s arrival in New Zealand on 12 August 1819. 

Two Great, Great, Great Grandsons of Rev Butler – Tim Ritchie and Douglas Barton – reflected on their ancestor at a service held at St James Church in Kerikeri, a brief walk from Kemp House and the Stone Store, now cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga. 

“It is very humbling to be here in this church which William Hall and John Gare Butler originally marked out on October 6, 1819,” Tim said.  

“Given the perils they faced together in their calling to missionary work, both John Butler and his wife Hannah clearly had a cooperative and loving relationship totally interdependent on each other.” 

While in New Zealand, the Butlers had a significant impact on agriculture according to Tim. 

“Rev John Butler clearly identified the potential for agriculture here – he recorded in his journal: ‘…there is no nation upon earth, perhaps, more favourable for the operations of agriculture than New Zealand’ which he said would ‘enable us to provide the first necessities of life’, and run schools that could not otherwise function ‘without the means of victualling the children’,” said Tim. 

“On May 3 1820, he recorded the first ever use of the agricultural plough in New Zealand and noted his thoughts in his journal: ‘I trust that this auspicious day will be remembered with gratitude, and its anniversary kept by ages yet unborn. Every heart seemed to rejoice on the occasion – I hope it will continue to increase, and in a short time produce an Abundant Harvest.’”

A year later, a report sent to the Church Missionary Society in London recorded what he and his team of Maori co-workers had achieved – seven acres of wheat, six acres of barley and oats, a variety of vegetables, fruit trees and ‘an excellent bed of hops’ – along with a potato house, fowl house and a goat house. He also noted in his report the building of a working house for his ‘working natives’ to live in and a small school house. 

“Many Butler descendants have agriculture, horticulture and viticulture in their DNA, farming through much of New Zealand – particularly the Wairarapa and Canterbury,” said Tim. 

“We can be very thankful of that pioneering Butler agricultural / horticultural gene.”

Rev Butler – who had worked as an accountant for a shipping company in London before coming to New Zealand – fell out with missionary chief Rev Samuel Marsden after he expressed concern to Marsden about financial issues relating to the mission. He was dismissed shortly after. 

According to Douglas Barton, Butler was respected by Maori who came from a distance of up to 30 miles to see him when news of the family’s departure became known in November 1823. 

“They anxiously enquired ‘what have we done to you?, pray tell us’. He could not tell them why, and appealed to their parental feelings by telling them that they needed to go to Port Jackson for the sake of little daughter Hannah’s health,” he said. 

New Zealand had not seen the last of Rev Butler however. The Butlers returned to New Zealand in 1840 with Rev Butler engaged by the New Zealand Company as a Native Guardian and Interpreter. 

The Arakite Trust: “Public Archaeology award for iwi-led trust” HNZPT Media Release

Public Archaeology award for iwi-led trust

A Northland iwi-led charitable trust has won this year’s New Zealand Archaeological Association (NZAA) Public Archaeology award. 

The Arakite Trust – which headed a two-week archaeological excavation at Mangahawea Bay in the Bay of Islands in January, and more recently a three day wānanga on traditional voyaging and navigation – took out the national award at this year’s recent NZAA conference held on Stewart Island.

The excavation and wānanga was funded by the Lottery Tuia – Encounters 250 Programme, and was supported by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, the Department of Conservation, the University of Otago and Te Rawhiti Marae.

“The Public Archaeology Award is an acknowledgement of Arakite Trust’s commitment to engage with the public in a way that increases understanding and appreciation of New Zealand’s rich archaeological heritage,” says Heritage New Zealand’s Northland Regional Archaeologist, Dr James Robinson, who together with Department of Conservation Ranger Andrew Blanshard, accepted the award on behalf of the Trust. 

The Arakite Trust organised a public open day during the 2019 excavation, as well as the recent wānanga and a historic cruise of the Bay of Islands which was open to the public – all part of the wider Mangahawea project. 

“In terms of fostering engagement with the public and archaeology the project has been a major success, quite apart from the archaeological significance of the work that was undertaken, which would never have happened without the Trust’s commitment to this kaupapa,” says James.

“Archaeology, traditional history and the hard sciences are different data bases, but when combined together can create something bigger than the sum of their individual parts.” 

According to the President of the NZAA Council, Katharine Watson, the Mangahawea Bay excavation project ticked all the boxes. 

“Criteria for winning the award includes making a contribution towards the identification, protection and preservation of archaeological sites; the enhancement of public awareness, enjoyment of and education about archaeology; and the strengthening of the relationship between Maori and the archaeological community,” she says. 

“The programme led by the Arakite Trust engaged the interest of hundreds of people who visited the site over the two-week excavation, as well as thousands of New Zealanders who learned about the excavation through extensive media coverage, which included national radio, television and press. 

“Historic Williams Shed a drawcard for visitors” HNZPT Media Release.

Image: HNZPT

Historic Williams Shed a drawcard for visitors

An unassuming stone shed dating back to the 1880s is proving to be a drawcard for visitors to Paihia. 

The Williams Shed, which sits within the historic Williams Homestead precinct, is making a name for itself as one of the country’s smallest – and perhaps most unlikely – museums.

“The shed is Paihia’s oldest surviving building, and had been languishing for years. It’s now a fully functioning part of the Williams House reserve in the heart of Paihia,” says Marg Civil, who is a Friends of the Williams House committee member.

“The shed has gone from being a bit of an eye-sore to being an attraction in its own right.”

Built from locally sourced brown rock – not known for its durability – the shed survived for over a hundred years thanks to an exceptionally good plastering job. 

After vandals damaged the historic shed in 2004, the Friends of the Williams House began a project to conserve and restore this original feature of the property that was settled by Church Missionary Society missionaries, Henry and Marianne Williams. The project was completed at the end of 2006. 

“More recently, the Friends commissioned Workshop E to design and construct a display facility within the stone shed to showcase its various uses over the years,” she says. 

The result has been the development of an innovative conservation and display solution for a number of artefacts related to the Williams family at Paihia. 

“You really couldn’t come up with a bigger challenge than displaying historic artefacts in a shed made from porous stone,” says Heritage New Zealand’s Northland Manager, Bill Edwards. 

“It’s cold and damp for a start – all the things you don’t want in an environment where artefacts are stored.” 

The solution developed by the Friends and Workshop E, however, is “nothing short of brilliant” according to Bill. 

“The large display cabinet in the middle of the shed is independently climate controlled and provides a secure way to display the artefacts in a way that is attractive and accessible,” he says. 

“New Zealand’s first national historic landmark announced” Hon Grant Robertson Media Release

Te Pitowhenua Waitangi Treaty Grounds is the country’s first National Historic Landmark, Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Grant Robertson announced at Waitangi today.

The new programme to establish National Historic Landmarks will help protect New Zealand’s defining moments in time and the special places that are the cornerstones of national identity.

“Some of these sites are associated with important and sometimes challenging discussions about the events that have shaped our past and will influence our future,” Grant Robertson says.

“Given the cultural, historic and social significance of this place, both before and after 6 February 1840, it’s appropriate the Waitangi Treaty Grounds is New Zealand’s first National Historic Landmark.”

Te Minita Whanaketanga Māori Minister for Māori Development Nanaia Mahuta says places such as Waitangi have deep significance to New Zealanders and its safeguarding is important to us all.

“Following discussions with site owners, iwi and the community, further Landmarks will be identified and added to the programme to recognise and preserve the heritage value of these places throughout the country,” Nanaia Mahuta says.

“A key objective of National Historic Landmarks is to help prioritise Government’s heritage conservation efforts. This includes developing long-term risk planning and management to ensure these places are earthquake resilient and protected from other natural disasters as much as possible.”

The National Historic Landmarks/Ngā Manawhenua o Aotearoa me ōna Kōrero Tūturu programme was introduced by the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014.  Heritage New Zealand works in partnership with Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage and other stakeholders including the Department of Conservation to deliver the programme.

Details about National Historic Landmarks is available on the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga website at: www.heritage.org.nz/the-list/national-historic-landmarks

Questions and Answers

Q 1: What is the National Historic Landmarks programme?

A: The National Historic Landmarks programme was introduced by the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 (HNZPTA) to acknowledge those places that New Zealanders demonstrably care about as cornerstones of national identity.

Q 2: Haven’t we already got a Landmarks programme?

A:Tohu Whenua is the new name of a tourism programme covering a nationwide regional group of visitor assets.  A pilot programme, under the name Landmarks Whenua Tohunga, was initiated in 2015 in Northland. Otago followed with the West Coast included in December 2018 under the new name Tohu Whenua.  The National Historic Landmarks programme, in contrast, recognises heritage places of deep significance to New Zealanders as the stories they tell are meaningful and their survival important to us all.

Q 3: Who runs Tohu Whenua?

A: Tohu Whenua is run by Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage, the Department of Conservation and Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga. The aim is to showcase our historic and culturally important places to locals and tourists in a coordinated way.  Heritage New Zealand now oversees this programme, with a programme manager based in Wellington.

Q 4: What is the aim of National Historic Landmarks?

A:The aim is to protect heritage places most important to New Zealanders through long-term risk planning and management, including from natural disaster. These places have rich historical, physical, and cultural significance and without them we are losing something special that identifies us as New Zealanders. A key policy objective of National Historic Landmarks is to help prioritise the government’s heritage conservation efforts, including earthquake strengthening. 

Q 5:  Who runs National Historic Landmarks?

A:The National Historic Landmarks programme was introduced by the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 (HNZPTA) as a way to better recognise and protect this country’s most outstanding heritage places.  Heritage New Zealand works in partnership with Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage and other stakeholders to deliver and promote the programme.

Q 6: How much is National Historic Landmarks costing the taxpayer?

A:The programme is being undertaken by Heritage New Zealand within existing baseline funding.  Heritage New Zealand adjusted some of its programmes to generate the financial and capacity requirements for National Historic Landmarks.

Q 7: What are the sites selected for National Historic Landmarks?

A:In 2015 Heritage New Zealand, in consultation with Manatū Taonga and the Department of Conservation, short-listed potential National Historic Landmarks. Te Pitowhenua Waitangi Treaty Grounds, Meretoto/Ship Cove and the National War Memorial (Wellington) are currently being progressed. Under the HNZPTA criteria and process, Heritage New Zealand recommends places for inclusion following public consultation with the Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage making the final decision.

Q 8:  How many National Historic Landmarks will there be?

A:Recognition is not based on achieving a set number, but rather by sites put forward meeting several thresholds. Any site can be proposed for recognition as a National Historic Landmark, and is then assessed in terms of heritage significance, risk management and community engagement. Rigorous criteria are applied to the assessment of what makes a National Historic Landmark.

Q 9: What is this ‘rigorous criteria’?

A:Places on the National Historic Landmarks list must be of outstanding national heritage value, having regard to the outstanding historical significance of the place in relation to people, events, and ideas of the past; the outstanding physical significance of the place in relation to its archaeological, architectural, design, and technological qualities; and the outstanding cultural significance of the place to tangata whenua and other communities in relation to its social, spiritual, traditional, or ancestral associations. Any nomination must first be listed on the New Zealand Heritage List and put through a public consultation process before being presented to Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage, Hon. Grant Robertson for approval.

Q 10: Are there any regulatory impositions on places deemed National Historic Landmarks?

A:All National Historic Landmarks have to demonstrate appropriate legal protection and risk management planning. Should Heritage New Zealand consider these are not fulfilled anymore by the owner a recommendation can be made to the Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage to remove the place’s recognition as a National Historic Landmark.

Q 11: So are the National Historic Landmarks places the government is going to protect if there is a natural disaster?

A:As these places are those recognised as most valuable to all New Zealanders priority will be given to ensuring they remain part of our history. Insightful conservation is key to the long-term protection of these places. To achieve this will require close relationships between government and those caring for these places to ensure long-term plans and daily efforts are closely aligned, with natural disaster risks appropriately managed.

Q 12Why was an Act, the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014, required to get them off the ground?

A: National Historic Landmarks/Ngā Manawhenua o Aotearoa me ōna Kōrero Tūturu was introduced by the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 to better recognise and protect this country’s most outstanding heritage places and help prioritise the government’s heritage conservation efforts.  Heritage New Zealand was charged with identifying places of outstanding national heritage value in terms of their historical, physical, and cultural significance.  The purpose of a National Historic Landmarks list is to promote an appreciation of the places of greatest heritage value to New Zealanders and the long-term protection of such places, including protection from natural disasters.

Q 13: How will I recognise one?

A: Every National Historic Landmark will have a wakahuia, a carved treasure box holding the certificate of Landmarks status, as a symbol of its National Historic Landmarks recognition. This recognition will be communicated via Heritage New Zealand and the owner’s website

The world’s daftest Indian? (HNZ Media Release)

The mysterious Army Indian Scout motorcycle.

May 23

MEDIA RELEASE

The world’s daftest Indian?

Was it an accidental wrong turn? Was it an ill-timed twist of the throttle? Was it the result of a night’s inebriation that may have led to a Court Martial? Nobody knows.

But one man would certainly like to find out.

Jack Kemp – a volunteer researcher for Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga – is keen to learn more about how this Army Indian Scout motorcycle (pictured) wound up in a swamp near Kerikeri.

“The army motorcycle had been retrieved from the swamp some years ago, and is now being cared for by members of the Vintage Car Club in Whangarei,” says Jack.

“People believe the motorbike found its way into the swamp during World War II, but nobody knows the circumstances in which the bike disappeared.”

Jack is appealing to anybody who may know – or may have heard stories, perhaps from family members in the past, about how the classic army motorcycle ended up in a bog.

“As part of carrying out research for Heritage New Zealand’s heritage inventory of war sites in Northland I have been involved in a number of oral history interviews, including people sharing mementoes and photographs from the war,” says Jack.

“We’ve discovered pictures of mysterious American float planes landing in Mangonui and a mine sweeper clearing sea mines from the Bay of Islands – and when we’ve put them out in the public domain it’s been amazing how much more information people have been able to share about them. We’re hoping we can pull it off again with our formerly submerged Indian.”

The Army Indian is made by the same company that made the Indian Scout motorcycle that was suped up by Invercargill speed king Bert Munro in his successful bid to break the motorcycle under-1000cc world record at Bonneville in August 1967. His epic run was later made famous in the movie The World’s Fastest Indian.

Although much loved by Munro, the Indian was not an easy motorcycle to drive as Heritage New Zealand’s Northland Manager Bill Edwards can attest.

“When I was younger I owned, briefly, an Army Indian Scout 741B. It was only 500cc, and was a very difficult bike to drive, with the right hand throttle set for ‘advance’ or ‘retard’ to line up the pistons properly for ignition. It also had a gear stick and a foot clutch. The throttle was operated by the left hand grip, and oddly enough you had to take your hand off the throttle to change gears,” Bill says.

“Presented with such a complex sequence of operation I can see how a driver could lose control of the bike quite easily during a tricky manoeuvre – or even encountering something a bit unexpected on the open road.”

Whether the complexity of operation was a contributing factor to the motorcycle ending up in the clag, or whether other factors came into play, the mystery of the misdirected Indian is worth following up according to Jack.

“Our research has touched on the daily lives of men and women in military service, volunteers and civilians, all of whom have shared some wonderful stories with us,” says Jack.

“We’d really love to hear the story of how the driver of this military motorbike may have taken the thrill of off-roading just a bit too far.”

Do you know what happened to the Army Indian motorcycle? Contact Bill Edwards on Ph 09-407-0471 or email bedwards@heritage.org.nz 

Tauranga archaeology to feature in NZ Archaeology Week (HNZPT Media Release 17.04.2019)

Bay of Plenty archaeologist, Ken Phillips (HNZPT Media Release)

April 17

MEDIA RELEASE

Tauranga archaeology to feature in NZ Archaeology Week

The spotlight will fall on Tauranga’s unique archaeology in two major events taking place in May. 

The events are part of the third annual NZ Archaeology Week – a nationwide celebration of New Zealand’s archaeological heritage which runs from April 24 to May 5. 

People can kick off their exploration of Tauranga’s archaeology by joining well-known Bay of Plenty archaeologist and heritage consultant, Ken Phillips, who will talk about the archaeology of early Te Papa including Otamataha pa – an important site in the history of Tauranga. 

Ken discovered the remains of a trench that runs through the Otamataha pa and will talk about the archaeology of the pa and the surrounding landscape. The public talk is a great opportunity to hear from an archaeologist who has researched, surveyed and investigated this area.

Join Ken Phillips in the Rose Garden (Robbins Park, Cliff Road, Tauranga) at 12.30pm on Thursday May 2 (Bookings not required). 

***

On May 3 Brigid Gallagher – local archaeologist, conservator and presenter on the British TV series Time Teamand host of the New Zealand Choice TV documentary series Heritage Rescue– will present a talk entitled Buried: Life Below the Streets of Tauranga

Brigid, who has directed a number of excavations in Tauranga’s central business district, will focus on the archaeology of the central city – including the site of the Tauranga Hotel (now the Lone Star). 

Brigid Gallagher will speak at the Council Chambers on Friday May 3 at 6pm.

To book for Brigid’s talk, follow the link: 

https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/brigid-gallagher-buried-life-below-the-streets-of-tauranga-tickets-59804892042

For more information on either event contact Heritage New Zealand’s Lower Northern office in Tauranga – Ph 07-577-4530 or email infolowernorthern@heritage.org.nz

“Walk and Talks to focus on Northland Archaeology” (HNZPT Media Release 17.04.2017)

April 17

MEDIA RELEASE

Walk and Talks to focus on Northland Archaeology

The spotlight will fall on Northland’s archaeology in two major events taking place in Whangarei on Saturday May 4. 

The events are part of the third annual NZ Archaeology Week – a nationwide celebration of New Zealand’s archaeological heritage which runs from April 24 to May 5. 

People can kick off their exploration of Northland archaeology with the Hatea River Hikoi– a walk ‘n’ talk led by students from Whangarei Boys High School with back-up from Heritage New Zealand’s Northland Manager, Bill Edwards. 

“Students will share what they have learned about the archaeological features of the area,” says Bill Edwards. 

“The features are quite stunning, and include early gardening and habitations, while illustrating how people have changed the landscape over the centuries. It has a very dynamic heritage story, and that’s part of what makes it really exciting. 

“This archaeological landscape is also very close to Whangarei’s CBD which is actually quite a rare thing in an urban setting.”

People interested in enjoying the free walk can gather at Hatea Drive opposite the Discovery Settlers Motel before the walk begins at 10am (look for the flagpole marking the meeting place).

Later that day, a panel of experts will present six talks focusing on different aspects of archaeology at the KiwiNorth Floor Talks, which will take place at 2pm on May 4. Each talk will be about 15 minutes long, including time for questions and answers. The talks will take place at the Vintage Car Club rooms at KiwiNorth (Admission $5 per person).

Floor Talk topics include: 

  • Korero Around Sources of Obsidian found in the Bay of IslandJohn and Webber Booth
  • WWII Camps in Northland- Jack Kemp and Dr Bill Guthrie
  • ‘Tākou - Red Earth, the Whenua in the Rohe of Hapū Ngāti Rēhia, Bay of Islands, Northland, NZ’  - Chris Booth
  • Evidence for Early Polynesian Voyaging to New Zealand- Ross and Gael Ramsay, Grahame Collett, Georgia Kerby
  • The Battle of Kororāreka – the start of the Northern Wars- Bill Edwards

Sharing of knowledge leads to ‘rediscovery’ of mission building (HNZ Media Release 18.03.2019)

Skinner descendants at Waima (HNZPT Media Release)

March 18

MEDIA RELEASE

Sharing of knowledge leads to ‘rediscovery’ of mission building

An important early building associated with the Wesleyan Mission in Waima has been ‘rediscovered’.

Waikaramihi, the historic church originally associated with the Hokianga mission, has been noted at its ‘new’ home – Tuhirangi Marae – over 30 years after it was relocated.

“Built in 1853, the church has been shifted twice in its history,” says Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Northland Manager, Bill Edwards.

“The church originally served the community at the Waima mission located up the Taheke River. The church was then moved closer to the Waima settlement in 1893, before its second relocation to the marae in 1988. We now know that the mission included the church building and school building, making the site more complex than what was depicted in early paintings.”

Knowledge of the church’s background came to light at the recent Te Tiriti o Waitangi celebrations at Mangungu Mission, commemorating the 179thanniversary of the third and largest Treaty signings that took place at the other main Wesleyan mission in the Hokianga based at Horeke.

Descendants of missionary Thomas Skinner who was stationed at Waima – a settlement that would eventually grow into a thriving economy based on farming and forestry – shared information about the church building with Heritage New Zealand staff at the event. They also talked about their discovery of a memorial stone celebrating the old oak which missionary John Warren planted in 1839.

“We were actually in the Hokianga to try to find the grave of Thomas Skinner, who died at the Mission in 1866 at the untimely age of 45,” says Thomas Skinner descendant, Tricia Rossiter.

“The family story held that he was buried near the Mission Oak at Waima so we went there to look for his grave. However, after prodding and poking in the long kikuyu around the fallen oak at the Waima site, one of the group found a plaque commemorating the tree, along with the date it was planted and acknowledgement of Rev John Warren as ‘the first missionary in Waima’.

“The stone had fallen off its plinth and was completely hidden under dense grass, though the writing on the stone was still quite legible.”

 

Historic photo highlights reality of Fortress Northland

HMNZS Killegray (Source Heritage New Zealand)

April 24

MEDIA RELEASE

Historic photo highlights reality of Fortress Northland

A striking photograph that serves as a reminder of Northland’s importance as a first line of defence against enemy invasion during World War II has surfaced as a result of a heritage inventory being undertaken by two Northland volunteers.

Jack Kemp and Dr Bill Guthrie, who have spent almost two years identifying and recording military places associated with World War II in Northland as volunteer researchers for Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, discovered the image while carrying out interviews with people who served in Northland during the War and their descendants.

One of the interviewees, Kevin Hall, is a collector of photos associated with the history of the Far North – including the black and white photo of HMNZS Killegrayclearing sea mines in the Bay of Islands.

“There’s something quite confronting about this picture which captures these deadly mines bobbing in the water, with the Bay of Islands’ distinctive Ninepin Rock – or Tikitiki – on the horizon,” says Heritage New Zealand’s Northland Manager, Bill Edwards.

“It’s a seascape loved by thousands of visitors – and yet here we see a bunch of mines floating in the water where many of us enjoy recreational water activities today. It’s a stark reminder that Northland was a fortress on high alert against attack after the bombing of Pearl Harbour.”

The photo was taken by Tudor Collins, who served as a petty officer in the Royal New Zealand Navy during the war. Prior to this, Collins had developed a reputation as a noted freelance who was one of the first photographers in Napier after the Hawke’s Bay earthquake of 1931. He also recorded Auckland’s Queen Street riots in 1932, and was the only photographer to meet the passengers and crew from the mined Niagrain June 1940.

“Despite the military purpose of Collins’ photo, it’s as much an example of New Zealand social history as his pre-war work,” says Bill. 

The mines depicted may have been part of a network of 13 loops of 16 contact mines in the channel between Moturoa and Moturua Islands, or more likely some of the 258 contact mines laid in three lines between Ninepin Rock and Whale Rock.

Further north, the Whangaroa Harbour was protected from seaborne invasion by a line of 30 mines across the entrance to the harbour which would have been activated from a Controlled Mining Station.

Mangungu Te Tiriti o Waitangi Commemorations – February 12 (2019)- HNZPT Media Release

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga is joining with Te Mana o Mangungu Hokianga Trust and Nga Uri Whakatupu o Hokianga to commemorate the anniversary of New Zealand’s largest signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi at Māngungu Mission on February 12.

Historically, the signing of the Treaty at Māngungu had a large impact on the community. About 70 rangatira gathered at the Mission and subsequently signed the Treaty, and between 2000 and 3000 Māori attended on the day. 

The original table on which Te Tiriti was signed is on display at Mangungu Mission, and this important artefact will play a central role in the commemorations.  

A display on Te Hokowhitu-a-Tu – the 28thMaori Battalion – will also feature in this year’s Tiriti event. 

(more…)