Tag: Media Release

Sharing of knowledge leads to ‘rediscovery’ of mission building (HNZ Media Release 18.03.2019)

Skinner descendants at Waima (HNZPT Media Release)

March 18

MEDIA RELEASE

Sharing of knowledge leads to ‘rediscovery’ of mission building

An important early building associated with the Wesleyan Mission in Waima has been ‘rediscovered’.

Waikaramihi, the historic church originally associated with the Hokianga mission, has been noted at its ‘new’ home – Tuhirangi Marae – over 30 years after it was relocated.

“Built in 1853, the church has been shifted twice in its history,” says Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Northland Manager, Bill Edwards.

“The church originally served the community at the Waima mission located up the Taheke River. The church was then moved closer to the Waima settlement in 1893, before its second relocation to the marae in 1988. We now know that the mission included the church building and school building, making the site more complex than what was depicted in early paintings.”

Knowledge of the church’s background came to light at the recent Te Tiriti o Waitangi celebrations at Mangungu Mission, commemorating the 179thanniversary of the third and largest Treaty signings that took place at the other main Wesleyan mission in the Hokianga based at Horeke.

Descendants of missionary Thomas Skinner who was stationed at Waima – a settlement that would eventually grow into a thriving economy based on farming and forestry – shared information about the church building with Heritage New Zealand staff at the event. They also talked about their discovery of a memorial stone celebrating the old oak which missionary John Warren planted in 1839.

“We were actually in the Hokianga to try to find the grave of Thomas Skinner, who died at the Mission in 1866 at the untimely age of 45,” says Thomas Skinner descendant, Tricia Rossiter.

“The family story held that he was buried near the Mission Oak at Waima so we went there to look for his grave. However, after prodding and poking in the long kikuyu around the fallen oak at the Waima site, one of the group found a plaque commemorating the tree, along with the date it was planted and acknowledgement of Rev John Warren as ‘the first missionary in Waima’.

“The stone had fallen off its plinth and was completely hidden under dense grass, though the writing on the stone was still quite legible.”

 

‘Daring’ discussion at Archaeology Week public talk : 2nd May (HNZ Media release)

April 23

MEDIA RELEASE

‘Daring’ discussion at Archaeology Week public talk

A public talk on New Zealand’s maritime archaeology and the challenges that heritage agencies face with climate change will feature as part of NZ Archaeology Week (April 24-May 5).

‘Uncovering New Zealand’s Maritime History’ will feature presentations by archaeologists Isaac McIvor of Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga who will be joined by Kurt Bennett, a consultant archaeologist specialising in marine archaeology. The talk takes place at 6pm on May 2ndat The Learning Space, New Zealand Maritime Museum.

The talk will include an exciting case study – the rediscovery, recording and recovery in 2018 of the schooner Daring, which was built in New Zealand in 1863 – looking at the different issues associated with archaeology and climate change.

The archaeologists will also be joined by Larry Paul, a member of the Daring Rescue group, who will discuss the Daring’sfuture.

The talk will take place 6pm on May 2ndat The Learning Space, New Zealand Maritime Museum. Bookings required – contact bookings@maritimemuseum.co.nz

Historic photo highlights reality of Fortress Northland

HMNZS Killegray (Source Heritage New Zealand)

April 24

MEDIA RELEASE

Historic photo highlights reality of Fortress Northland

A striking photograph that serves as a reminder of Northland’s importance as a first line of defence against enemy invasion during World War II has surfaced as a result of a heritage inventory being undertaken by two Northland volunteers.

Jack Kemp and Dr Bill Guthrie, who have spent almost two years identifying and recording military places associated with World War II in Northland as volunteer researchers for Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, discovered the image while carrying out interviews with people who served in Northland during the War and their descendants.

One of the interviewees, Kevin Hall, is a collector of photos associated with the history of the Far North – including the black and white photo of HMNZS Killegrayclearing sea mines in the Bay of Islands.

“There’s something quite confronting about this picture which captures these deadly mines bobbing in the water, with the Bay of Islands’ distinctive Ninepin Rock – or Tikitiki – on the horizon,” says Heritage New Zealand’s Northland Manager, Bill Edwards.

“It’s a seascape loved by thousands of visitors – and yet here we see a bunch of mines floating in the water where many of us enjoy recreational water activities today. It’s a stark reminder that Northland was a fortress on high alert against attack after the bombing of Pearl Harbour.”

The photo was taken by Tudor Collins, who served as a petty officer in the Royal New Zealand Navy during the war. Prior to this, Collins had developed a reputation as a noted freelance who was one of the first photographers in Napier after the Hawke’s Bay earthquake of 1931. He also recorded Auckland’s Queen Street riots in 1932, and was the only photographer to meet the passengers and crew from the mined Niagrain June 1940.

“Despite the military purpose of Collins’ photo, it’s as much an example of New Zealand social history as his pre-war work,” says Bill. 

The mines depicted may have been part of a network of 13 loops of 16 contact mines in the channel between Moturoa and Moturua Islands, or more likely some of the 258 contact mines laid in three lines between Ninepin Rock and Whale Rock.

Further north, the Whangaroa Harbour was protected from seaborne invasion by a line of 30 mines across the entrance to the harbour which would have been activated from a Controlled Mining Station.

“Tax changes for earthquake-prone buildings wins support” James Blackburne President HPA (Media Release)

 Tax changes for earthquake-prone buildings wins support 

 Historic Places Aotearoa applauds the tax working group’s proposed changes to tax policy relating to earthquake strengthening of buildings. 

HPA President James Blackburne supports the initiative to review or change the tax policy as it would benefit owners of earthquake-prone buildings, many of which are an integral part of New Zealand’s heritage . 

“One option being considered is to restore building depreciation for seismic strengthening work on commercial, industrial and multi-unit residential buildings. 

“Reinstating building depreciation deductions or allowing owners to claim strengthening as a repair and maintenance cost will benefit owners of earthquake-prone buildings. 

”While the devil will be in the detail as to whether it will be implemented and in what form, the underlying concept of tax relief will have a positive effect because it will reduce the cost to building owners of strengthening buildings and may mean that strengthening is considered rather than demolition being seen as the only viable option. 

“We believe this will have a positive effect on the retention rate of heritage buildings throughout New Zealand, and in particular provincial New Zealand, where many main streets are lined with unreinforced masonry heritage buildings.” 

Mr Blackburne said the proposed tax change, in addition to the continuing with Heritage EQUIP grants, would be of benefit to owners. 

Heritage EQUIP offers two grants for seismic strengthening projects – Upgrade Works Grants to a maximum of $400,000 or, for regional building owners, up to two thirds of seismic upgrade works; and Professional Advice Grants to a maximum of $50,000 per project or, for regional building owners, up to two thirds of professional advice costs. 

The new professional advice grants are aimed specifically at regional building owners outside the three main centres. 

 James Blackburne 
President Historic Places Aotearoa 

 P 0274818093 

c/o P O Box 1241 
GISBORNE 4040

“Better regional assistance for earthquake-prone heritage buildings” Hon Grant Robertson, Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage (Media Release 11.02.2019)

Better regional assistance for earthquake-prone heritage buildings

Hon Grant Robertson Assoc Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage

Owners of heritage buildings in regional areas are set to benefit from changes to Heritage EQUIP, the national earthquake upgrade incentive programme, Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage Grant Robertson announced today. 

“Heritage buildings are integral to the character of regional New Zealand, but the cost of strengthening can be prohibitive for owners in these areas,” Grant Robertson said.

“These owners face lower building incomes and values that often don’t justify the upgrade expense, and there can also be a shortage of locally available professional advice.

“Tailoring funding for heritage building owners in regional, medium and high seismic risk areas gives them more options to manage the unique earthquake strengthening challenges they face. 

“These owners are now eligible for new Professional Advice Grants, which are designed to assist people at the beginning of the earthquake upgrade process.

“The grants provide up to 50 per cent of the costs required for obtaining services such as detailed seismic assessments, conservation reports, architectural and structural engineering plans.

“Many regional building owners are also able to apply for up to 67 percent of upgrade works costs.

“As an extra incentive, multiple-building applications can seek funding of up to 67 per cent of professional advice costs.

“I encourage building advisors, councils, civic and heritage trusts and other qualified entities to work on behalf of groups of building owners in regional locations.

“Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage, which administers the Heritage EQUIP fund, is also in the process of establishing a pilot partnership programme with selected local authorities, to address local issues and identify seismic strengthening pathways.

“Government is keen to ensure more building owners access Heritage EQUIP funding to secure their valuable heritage buildings for the future, and these changes will help to facilitate this,” Grant Robertson said.

Applications for Heritage EQUIP funding are received three times per year, with upcoming rounds closing on 22 March and 29 July 2019.

Detailed information about the new incentives, along with advice for building owners planning seismic strengthening projects, is available at www.heritageequip.govt.nz

Ends

Mangungu Te Tiriti o Waitangi Commemorations – February 12 (2019)- HNZPT Media Release

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga is joining with Te Mana o Mangungu Hokianga Trust and Nga Uri Whakatupu o Hokianga to commemorate the anniversary of New Zealand’s largest signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi at Māngungu Mission on February 12.

Historically, the signing of the Treaty at Māngungu had a large impact on the community. About 70 rangatira gathered at the Mission and subsequently signed the Treaty, and between 2000 and 3000 Māori attended on the day. 

The original table on which Te Tiriti was signed is on display at Mangungu Mission, and this important artefact will play a central role in the commemorations.  

A display on Te Hokowhitu-a-Tu – the 28thMaori Battalion – will also feature in this year’s Tiriti event. 

(more…)

Heritage New Zealand properties open free on Waitangi Day – HNZPT Media Release (30:01:19)

Properties in Northland cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga will once again open their doors to the public free of charge on Waitangi Day.

The historic places include Pompallier Mission (Russell), Kemp House and the Stone Store (Kerikeri), Te Waimate Mission (Waimate North), Mangungu Mission (Horeke) and Clendon House (Rawene). 

The country’s lead heritage organisation cares for these properties on behalf of all New Zealanders, and the free entry is its way to help commemorate and reflect on our national day.  This year’s main theme will be ‘the building of a nation’.

“This theme relates to our built heritage as representative of what preceded the 1840 signing and what dated it,” says Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Chief Executive Andrew Coleman.

“They are physical reminders, or touchstones, of Māori and Pākehāinteraction; of who we are, where we have come from and where we will collectively go as New Zealanders.

“Our properties tell a small part of a wider story of the nation.  They are open free of charge to enjoy, learn from and appreciate a snapshot of our history. 

“The objective of the open day is to promote the significance of Heritage New Zealand places that contribute to the story of early Māori and Pākehāinteraction and the progression to the multicultural society we are today in a family, fun and inclusive way,” says Andrew.

The open day is part of Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga’s commitment to honouring the vision for Māori heritage as contained in the Māori Heritage Council’s document Tapuwae.

“Tapuwae means ‘sacred footprint’.  The purpose of the document, and the properties opening, is to further express the idea that we can look back to see where we have been as we move forward, taking more steps,” says Andrew.

“It’s a day of commemoration and reflection.  We hope all New Zealanders take the opportunity to visit one or more of these special places.”

For more information please visit www.heritage.org.nz

“Heritage New Zealand properties ( Highwic & Alberton) open free on Waitangi Day” HNZPT Media Release (30:01:19)

Properties in Auckland cared for by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga will once again open their doors to the public free of charge on Waitangi Day.

The historic places include Highwic in Newmarket and Alberton in Mt Albert. 

The country’s lead heritage organisation cares for these properties on behalf of all New Zealanders, and the free entry is its way to help commemorate and reflect on our national day.  This year’s main theme will be ‘the building of a nation’.

“This theme relates to our built heritage as representative of what preceded the 1840 signing and what dated it,” says Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Chief Executive Andrew Coleman.

“They are physical reminders, or touchstones, of Māori and Pākehāinteraction; of who we are, where we have come from and where we will collectively go as New Zealanders.

“Our properties tell a small part of a wider story of the nation.  They are open free of charge to enjoy, learn from and appreciate a snapshot of our history. 

“The objective of the open day is to promote the significance of Heritage New Zealand places that contribute to the story of early Māori and Pākehāinteraction and the progression to the multicultural society we are today in a family, fun and inclusive way,” says Andrew.

The open day is part of Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga’s commitment to honouring the vision for Māori heritage as contained in the Māori Heritage Council’s document Tapuwae.

“Tapuwae means ‘sacred footprint’.  The purpose of the document, and the properties opening, is to further express the idea that we can look back to see where we have been as we move forward, taking more steps,” says Andrew.

“It’s a day of commemoration and reflection.  We hope all New Zealanders take the opportunity to visit one or more of these special places.”

For more information please visit www.heritage.org.nz

“National Historic Landmarks submissions sought” Heritage New Zealand (Media Statement 24/01/2019)

Public submissions are being sought for the proposed recognition of the Waitangi Treaty Grounds as a National Historic Landmark.

The Public submissions are being sought for the proposed recognition of the Waitangi Treaty Grounds as a National Historic Landmark.

The National Historic Landmarks/Ngā Manawhenua o Aotearoa me ōna Kōrero Tūturu programme has been established to better recognise and protect this country’s most outstanding heritage places.  It was introduced by the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014 to help prioritise the government’s heritage conservation efforts.

"National Historic Landmarks are significant and meaningful places that shape our national identity," says Heritage New Zealand’s Director Policy Rebecca O’Brien.

"They are the places most important to us, places that symbolise what it means to be a New Zealander.  The Waitangi Treaty Grounds is perhaps the most fitting place to be put forward for inclusion as the first National Historic Landmark."

Following the public consultation process Heritage New Zealand recommends places for inclusion to the Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage, Hon. Grant Robertson to make the final decision.

"The aim of National Historic Landmarks is to protect those heritage places most important to New Zealanders through long-term risk planning and management, including from natural disaster," says Rebecca.

"It’s certainly hard to imagine New Zealand without the Waitangi Treaty Grounds.  It’s an entrenched part of our history, culture and heritage and without it we would lose something very special.  This programme identifies those places that we have such a strong association with or connection to."

Heritage New Zealand is working in partnership with the Ministry for Culture and Heritage and other stakeholders to deliver and promote the programme.

Submissions on the Waitangi Treaty Grounds proposal close on 12 February.  

For further information:

Michelle Horwood
Manager Heritage Listing
email: mhorwood@heritage.org.nz
tel: (04) 470 8059 or  027 218 4484.

“Oral history workshop a hit” (Heritage New Zealand Media Release)

Atareiria Heihei, Monica Heihei, Taina McGregor, Jack Kemp and Sarah Taiapo practice their video interview skills on the oral history workshop. (l-r)

"A workshop designed to help people hone their skills in recording oral history may be the first of many.
The two-day seminar, held in Kerikeri recently, was led by Taina McGregor, Oral History Advisor, Maori at the Alexander Turnbull Library, and has earned rave reviews from participants on the pilot course according to organiser Atareiria Heihei of Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga. "

“It was also great to be able to share this knowledge with other people who are working with oral history, or who want to become more involved. We’re looking forward to holding more of these two day courses next year, and will publicise dates and times once details are finalised.” 

A workshop on writing abstracts for recorded interviews is currently being organised for the new year

(more…)