Tag: Historic Places Mid Canterbury

The First Blue Plaque Is Unveiled By Historic Places Mid Canterbury: The Ashburton Railway Footbridge

The Blue Plaque is unveiled by Councillor Lynette Lovett, Nigel Gilkison ( Deputy Chair HPMC) and Dr Anna Crighton

The Blue Plaque on its concrete plinth.

Historic Places Mid Canterbury has unveiled their first Blue Plaque marking the Centenary of the Ashburton Railway Footbridge.
The plaque was formally unveiled at 10am on the 24th November.
There was a very well attended celebration Morning Tea at the Ashburton Museum afterwards.

Full credit goes to Nigel Gilkison who drove the project &
HPMC , McIntosh Precast Ltd who made / sponsored the concrete plinth and
Ashburton District Council who sponsored the plaques casting.

Historic Places Mid Canterbury Unveils The Ashburton Railway Footbridge Blue Plaque

The Blue Plaque on its concrete plinth.

Historic Places Mid Canterbury (HPMC) unveiled their first Blue Plaque. The Blue Plaque celebrates 100 years of the iconic Ashburton Railway Pedestrian Footbridge.

The Blue Plaque is an initiative of  HPMC and expect to see more of them as they start to market the project around the country.

https://historicplacesaotearoa.org.nz/the-first-blue-plaque-is-unveiled-by-historic-places-mid-canterbury-the-ashburton-railway-footbridge/

Historic Places Mid Canterbury Members Only: Garden Party On Sunday February 19th At 2pm

Historic Places Mid Canterbury Garden Party is being held this Sunday February 19th February at 2pm.

"Dainty cakes, fancy treats and fine bone china are also on the agenda."

This is a Member's Only Event, though you can bring a friend-

to reserve a place, venue details etc   RSVP to Marian Martin on 308-8342 or Julie  Luxton on 308-3866.
There is a small charge of $5 each to cover costs.

Historic Places Mid Canterbury “Bus trip up to Hakatere!” On Saturday October 15th (2016)

Bus trip up to Hakatere!

The Hakatere Heritage Buildings
are set in the magic of our backcountry, 20 minutes beyond Mount Somers, up the Ashburton Gorge.
They are a great restoration success story for heritage.

Historic-Places-Mid-Canterbury-Purple-logoOn Saturday October 15th
Historic Places Mid Canterbury
invite you to join them for an afternoon up at Hakatere.
Bus leaves Ashburton at 12.30pm

But this isn't just any ordinary visit to Hakatere! We are going to be hearing some great stories associated with this cluster of buildings directly from the main driver of the project, David Howden. We will tap into David’s head full of history to glean new and interesting facts about these icon buildings. Hear about the projects being undertaken, ie the tin boat and shed, view the killing and skinning shed, and we might even hear about the old stables!

A yummy afternoon tea will be served in the old cook-shop.

A short AGM will follow afternoon tea. We should have you back in Ashburton around 5.30pm.

hakatere-imageSaturday October 15
Bus leaves at 12.30pm from outside the Ashburton District Council buildings. .
Non members are welcome $20 per person
HPMC Members $15.00 per person

The stone cottage, circa 1862, is now nearing restoration completion. DOC, who manage the site, secured monies for this, the shortfall made up by an enthusiastic committee, who have put in many hundreds of hours of voluntary work and fundraising. The single-men’s quarters also dates from the late 1800’s and DoC has made the lounge into an information room about the Hakatere Conservation Park. Any queries please phone

Julie Luxton on 308-3866 or 027 303 8834

“Anaya Woolshed” (A History) – ” …. Many believe that the original surviving parts of this shed are claim to the oldest surviving woolshed in New Zealand. …”

Anama Woolshed

Anama Woolshed has been added onto over its long lifetime

Anama Woolshed has been added onto over its long lifetime

By Julie Luxton

Let us journey back to 161 years ago and paint a picture in our mind of two pioneering men, squatters from Australia, living in a large woolshed at what is now called Anama.

The woolshed was without doors or windows, no chimney, built from nearby Manuka and thatched on top and sides with cabbage tree leaves. The fire was made in the middle of the floor and at night a blanket was hung up to serve as a door. The year is 1855 and well known pioneer John Barton Acland of Peel Forest sheltered for the night in this very woolshed.

Acland wrote in his diary “Russell and Rogers, with Seward and an Irish shepherd are living, and have been living for twelve months in a large woolshed………   It is a wonder why some people will make themselves so needlessly uncomfortable.” (more…)