“Famous artist Bill Sutton’s Christchurch red zone house saved from demolition, will be restored and gifted to city” The Press (Online Article)

Famous artist Bill Sutton's Christchurch red zone house saved from demolition, will be restored and gifted to city The Press

"Renowned New Zealand artist Bill Sutton's former home and studio in Christchurch's residential red zone has been saved from demolition.

Instead, it will be restored and gifted to the city. ..."

https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/103256576/famous-artist-bill-suttons-christchurch-red-zone-house-saved-from-demolition-will-be-restored-and-gifted-to-city

Blue Heritage Plaque Contact Details

Are you interested in a Blue Heritage Plaque?

Historic Places Canterbury is the local contact if you are interested in a Blue Heritage Plaque.
The Contact Email for the Blue Heritage Plaque Project is: blueplaque@historicplacesaotearoa.org.nz

The Blue Heritage Plaque- An Explanation

The Blue Heritage Plaques project is a new initiative from Historic Places Mid Canterbury to identify and promote our local built heritage, through the use of a distinctive and bold blue cast aluminium plaque fixed to the facades of our more significant historic buildings. (more…)

“Women in Archaeology A national Archaeology Week event” 7.00pm, 6th May Teece Museum of Classical Antinquities 3 Hereford Street, Christchurch

Women in ArchaeologyA national Archaeology Week event

06/05/2018

Women’s history is hidden history. Official histories, records and publications usually chart men’s lives. Archaeology is one of the ways we can uncover the female perspective by finding out what women in the past owned, did with their bodies, created, and consumed.

The UC Teece Museum of Classical Antiquities and Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga are hosting an amazing line-up of six female archaeologists, who will talk and answer questions on how archaeology can reveal women’s hidden histories. Join us to hear about women in the Mithraic cult, Iberian pre-history, and colonial Christchurch.

because this year is the 125th anniversary of New Zealand women winning the vote, the conversation will also focus on the personal and professional decisions of our female archaeologists. In the first half, oral historian Rosemary Baird will engage three of our archaeologists in a frank discussion about the why and how of their careers. The second half features a "show and tell" artefact session of post-earthquake artefacts relating to Canterbury women, followed by an illustrated talk on the international history of female archaeologists.

Part of the nationwide NZAA Archaeology Week programme, this free event has a limit of 60 seats, so be sure to book quickly. Guests will also invited to explore the Teece Museum’s new exhibition Beyond the Grave: Death in ancient times (opening 5 May) during the intermission.

When?Sunday 6 May 7.00pm
Venue Teece Museum of Classical Antinquities 3 Hereford Street, Christchurch (access via Arts Centre South Quad)

Tickets Tickets available - see www.canterbury.ac.nz

Victoria Square Re-Opening: Speech Given By Dr. Anna Crighton.

Victoria Square's Bowker Fountain at night. (Image sourced Otakaro)

Dr Anna Crighton has generously provided us with the text of the speech she gave at the Victoria Square Re-Opening.

The history of Victoria Square was the subject of Dr Crighton's speech.
"So Victoria Square has had a colourful history, pre and post European settlement. It was a favourite food gathering place for Maori, it was the centre of the city in early settlement times and it was the birthplace of radical Christchurch. Victoria Square is historically relevant for Christchurch - past present and into the future as a contemplative heart of the city – it is Christchurch at its best."
The text of Dr. Crighton's speech is as follows:
 
VICTORIA SQUARE REOPENING
Friday 9 April 2018

(more…)

Historic Places Canterbury In The News: “Heritage advocates want more historic buildings to be protected from demolition in emergencies” (Stuff Online Article)

Heritage advocates want more historic buildings to be protected from demolition in emergencies (Stuff online article)

https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/108733704/heritage-advocates-want-more-historic-buildings-to-be-protected-from-demolition-i

"Heritage advocates, Historic Places Aotearoa, want more heritage buildings to be protected from demolition in emergencies, its submission on the Building Amendment Bill says.

The bill, currently at select committee, adds emergency powers to and amends the Building Act 2004 to improve systems for managing damaged dangerous buildings in emergencies and for investigating building failures.

It protects category one buildings and wahi tupuna, places of significance to Maori, listed with Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga (HNZPT) from demolition in emergencies without ministerial approval."

"Historic Places Aotearoa, and a member organisation Historic Places Canterbury, want the protection in the bill widened to include top tier or highly significant heritage buildings scheduled in territorial authorities' district plans.' "

"(Director of policy Rebecca O'Brien) HNZPT is pleased at the provisions proposed to date and the progress they represent in providing appropriate protection for New Zealand's heritage.

However, Historic Places Aotearoa (HPA) and Historic Places Canterbury, disagree

HPA said too often demolition was seen as the only solution to public protection after a disaster.

It was the territorial authorities' heritage schedules that had standing under the Resource Management Act.

The bill's proposals might set aside RMA processes in emergencies, so it was essential the schedules were considered in the bill's proposals, HPA argued."

 

Christchurch City Council Draft Heritage Strategy 2019-2029 : Submission from Historic Places Canterbury.

 

 

 

 

 

Christchurch City Council Draft Heritage Strategy 2019-2029

Submission from Historic Places Canterbury.

The Process of Consultation and Formulation of the Draft Heritage Strategy:

Historic Places Canterbury (HPC) wishes to commend the Christchurch City Council Heritage Team for its efforts in Community Consultation, developing and delivering this Draft Heritage Strategy (Strategy). The Heritage Teams leadership has benefitted the process thus far and HPC considers it essential that they continue to lead in all subsequent work related and resulting from the Strategy.

Secondly Historic Places Canterbury formally knowledges the actions of the Christchurch City Councillors who adopted the Heritage Team’s recommendation of starting this process by right at the beginning asking the residents, groups and Communities of Christchurch what they wanted in the Christchurch City Council Heritage Strategy and then developing the draft strategy driven by the Residents, groups and Communities responses. In addition, the CCC Heritage Team sought feedback in the process of formulating the Draft Heritage Strategy.

Historic Places Canterbury was pleased to learn that the Mayor and Councillors individually involved themselves in the workshops and events that were used to develop this Draft Heritage Strategy.

Historic Places Canterbury considers the process and philosophy used for the Draft Heritage Heritage Strategy adopted by the Heritage Team and the Christchurch City Council (CCC) as one that should be used as a Council Template for future Consultations especially concerning Heritage.

 

Historic Places Canterbury requests the Christchurch City Council share these processes and experiences with other Territorial Authorities as we consider they and heritage will benefit from this approach of consultation and this process of strategy formulation becoming more widespread.

General Overall Comment on Draft Heritage Strategy:

Historic Places Canterbury is in agreement with the Strategy and our comments are mainly suggestions of refinement. HPC considers it is an important to consolidate and recognise the many informal relationships as well as establish new ones with the Communities that make up Christchurch and the Banks Peninsula. HPC fully endorses this approach.

Historic Places Canterbury considers the partnership, participation, role and acknowledgement of the Papatipu Rūnanga as being essential and long overdue.

Historic Place Canterbury is supportive of the Draft Heritage Strategy’s recognition and inclusion of the heritage of those who are not part of the traditional European heritage and again we consider this long overdue.

Historic Places Canterbury notes the extensive use of the work “community” in the text of the Strategy.  HPC requests “community” should be substituted with the word “Communities” or something similar in meaning.  HPC notes the phrase “communities of Christchurch and Banks Peninsula” (p16 of the Draft Heritage Strategy) sums up the intention of the documents.

The Strategy uses the phrase “partnership with six papatipu rūnanga” to define its relationship.

For the Community/Communities it uses the word “collaboration” and “together with the community” within the Strategy.

HPC requests the CCC reconsider the relationships (as defined in the Strategy) with the Communities and change it to one of Partnership or Collaboration as appropriate?

The Strategy mentions a “Charter” which effectively quantifies the CCC heritage relationship with the Communities.

(HPC notes the terms and conditions for those who take part in Heritage Week could be described as partnership agreements.) Defining relationships clearly also means there is less chance of a misunderstanding.

Historic Places Canterbury considers the Draft Heritage Strategy needs more development in dealing with our digital heritage future which is already here and will continue to exert a growing and significant presence. The CCC has put online the Scheduled Heritage Building’s own Statements of Significance but what is its Strategy when it comes to its own history and the social history of the buildings it has within its custody?(At one stage an oral history project recording the experiences of those who worked in the Canterbury Provincial Chambers was being discussed.)

 

Historic Places Canterbury would like the Strategy to give an indication of the variety of roles CCC envisages it will be providing in supporting the Communities of Christchurch and Banks Peninsula in their attempts to record and promote their heritage.

HPC notes the Library has a digital archive along with the Canterbury Museum’s collection and similar organisations such as Wigram and Akaroa, the Hall of Flame at Ferrymead etc and the University of Canterbury and the Strategy needs to look at the relationships the CCC has with these. What are the Community Board’s role within their local area? How is their local history and objects to be recorded or kept?

The Strategy correctly identifies the importance of intangible heritage as it relates to the stories of a heritage building. Questions will then be asked, for example, will the Library have a role in facilitating or storing those oral histories?

Historic Places Canterbury notes that a workshop participant commented the Strategy has the potential to be a part of the core of the CCC in its functions. HPC submits the Strategy provides an opportunity for the CCC to lead by example in demonstrating the importance of our City’s and Banks Peninsula’s heritage.

The Strategy commits the Christchurch City Council to be an active Heritage participant as evidenced by the word’s “collaboration” and “partnership”.

Historic Places Canterbury fully endorses this approach.

Such an approach will necessitate a cultural change within sections of the Bureaucracy especially as it will require a change to the traditional bureaucratic top down decision making management style which will at minimum have to be more open and communicative. HPC considers the Councillors will have to lead by example as they have thus far in this process.

 

Historic Places Canterbury is aware of the work published, such as by Building Economist Donovan Rypkema which conclusively provides evidence of the positive economic contribution of Heritage Buildings (and their retention). (These economic benefits are not just confined to Tourism.)

The Strategy, HPC requests should have additional text that states that the CCC understands and accepts the Economic Value of Heritage Buildings, the value of their active retention and the positive economic effects i.e. revitalization, restoration benefits etc they have on the local economy.

Specific Strategy Comments:

 

Whāinga  Goals (p34)

Historic Places Canterbury requests an additional Whāinga be added, that the CCC will commit to updating and regularly add heritage buildings and sites to its District Plan Heritage Schedule.

HPC understands that between 1996 and recent Independent Hearing Panel there were little or no Christchurch Heritage Buildings Scheduled. It is important to acknowledge the importance of heritage however the CCC needs to actually commit itself to fulfilling its RMA Duties in its own Heritage Strategy.

Historic Places Canterbury requests the Strategy state that it will be adopted as binding by the Council as a whole. 

HPC understands that the Urban Design Panel approved plans for the proposed demolition of the Harley Chambers, a scheduled heritage building. Whilst HPC does not wish to curb the independence of the Urban Design Panel it is not unreasonable that the Strategy be respected and acknowledged by such organisations and only in exceptional circumstances should the Strategy be ignored.

Mahinga Actions

Whāinga Goal 1. (page 35) …

“4. Celebrate and promote the Council’s role as heritage champion…

  1. Celebrate how the Council models best practice asset management ..”

Historic Places Canterbury requests that an addition be made to this section that the CCC will commit to share its knowledge and experience of heritage management best practice.

The Council has extensive experience knowledge in all aspects of heritage building management i.e. procurement, project management, budget, engaging professionals and HPC considers a practical Strategy is to commit to sharing its knowledge and experience with Heritage Building Owners and other Territorial Authorities.

Historic Places Canterbury requests that Whāinga Goal 1 contain a paraphrase of Whāinga Goal 2 section 4.

HPC proposes that  “The Council …” add the following;

Raise awareness of Our Heritage, Our Taonga across all Council Departments.

Whāinga Goal 2

Historic Places Canterbury fully endorses Whāinga Goal 2.

Whāinga Goal 3

Historic Places Canterbury fully endorses Whāinga Goal 3.

Historic Places Canterbury requests further consideration be given to this goal and the responsibility that will need to taken on by the Community Boards.

For example HPC notes that Crown Glass used to be a prominent industry in Hornby with artisans living close by. HPC considers the Strategy should enable the local Community Board to participate in celebrating and preserving its own unique community heritage.

Whāinga Goal 4

Historic Places Canterbury requests that under

(Section) “4 Support owners of heritage building through; …. ”

Historic Places Canterbury request that an addition be made to this section of the Strategy. The CCC work on a standard or accredited list of approved suppliers of Heritage Plaques for owners of Heritage Buildings. These plaques would publicly identify that the building is a historic building.

 

Historic Places Canterbury’s federated national body Historic Places Aotearoa has recently launched a nationally available Heritage “Blue” Plaque project (inspired by the UK Blue Plaque) which allows a building to be identified as heritage. Such a project is an ideal candidate for accreditation as well as being part of an emerging national standard.

Whakatinanatanga Implementation (p42)

“Implementation of this strategy depends upon partnership and collaboration.”

Historic Places Canterbury fully endorses this approach.

As noted above HPC requests the CCC reconsider and describe the relationships in the Strategy with its Communities as one of Partnership and or Collaboration.

HPC considers the Heritage Charter to be an excellent initiative and is looking forward to hearing the Communities heritage voices.

 

HPC requests as part of the Whakatinanatanga that consideration be given to setting up a Forum and or Reference Group that would meet on a regular basis.

As well as enabling the CCC to receive feedback it will have the additional advantage of allowing the sharing and exchanging of views.  The CCC could use this to facilitate the sharing and understanding of views from the Papatipu Rūnanga and the wider Communities.

We wish to heard by the Hearing Panel.

Mark Gerrard
Chair Historic Places Canterbury
021157 5043

 CHRISTCHURCH CIVIC TRUST AND HISTORIC PLACES CANTERBURY DEPUTATION TO THE CHRISTCHURCH CITY COUNCIL OPPOSING THE RSA REQUEST FOR THE SHIFTING OF THE CITIZENS’ WAR MEMORIAL FROM CATHEDRAL SQUARE 27.09.18 Ross Gray, Deputy Chair CCT, HPC 

 CHRISTCHURCH CIVIC TRUST AND HISTORIC PLACES CANTERBURY DEPUTATION TO THE CHRISTCHURCH CITY COUNCIL OPPOSING THE RSA REQUEST FOR THE SHIFTING OF THE CITIZENS’ WAR MEMORIAL FROM CATHEDRAL SQUARE 27.09.18 Ross Gray, Deputy Chair CCT, HPC 

The Citizens’ War Memorial monument is a vital and integral component of the city’s most important public space, Cathedral Square, and it is essential that it remains so in the post-disaster years. Its structural and visual form creates a carefully orchestrated synergy with the structure, form and symbolism of Christchurch Cathedral. 

It needs the cathedral and the cathedral needs it, because of a shared meaning embodied in the crucifix form of both structures. We can see this in the Latin cross floor plan of the cathedral and in the 15m high structural cross of the War Memorial. This is no accident or coincidence: the Anglican Church gave explicit instructions on these design matters and sculptor William Trethewey and architect George Hart fully and faithfully executed them. In doing so they created what eminent New Zealand historian Jock Phillips says is possibly ‘…the finest public monument in the country'. To separate the two structures would be to considerably diminish both heritage structures. 

Re-stated: for more than half its life Christchurch Cathedral has been the core of a shared civic experience of great profundity with its nearest neighbour, the Citizens’ War Memorial. The Civic Trust and Historic Places Canterbury cannot see any valid reason to sever this physical and deeply symbolic bond. 

The Christchurch City Council through its ratepayers has recently agreed to contribute a generous $10m to the reinstatement of Christchurch Cathedral, with some stated restrictions. This follows a long history of the council making a significant contribution to the cathedral, including re-roofing and earthquake strengthening. Furthermore, the current concept plan by Regenerate Christchurch for the future of Cathedral Square shows the Citizens’ War Memorial in its present position. Planners have clearly not considered its presence a problem: rather they see it as part of the mix of features contributing towards a vibrant civic centre. The council has agreed to contribute half the initial costs for the redevelopment of Cathedral Square and must do all it can to strengthen the “Square experience”. The objection, that the cathedral is some years away from re-occupation, may be true, but in the interim, the south facing areas of the new City Library offer quiet spaces with views out to the War Memorial. 

In light of these factors it would be highly counter-productive for the council to accede to the RSA’s request to move the Memorial away from Cathedral Square to another city location. 

The RSA submission takes little account of the War Memorial’s function to be a reminder and a memorial of war and sacrifice for everyone, certainly not just for the comrades, family members or descendants of Association members. For instance: thousands of German and Japanese tourists come to Christchurch annually. Those tourists, descendants of some who will have fought against New Zealanders, are most unlikely to make a special trip to another open space to visit the Citizens’ War Memorial relocated there. In fact, because Christchurch Cathedral is so close to the War Memorial, visitors to it are provided with a magnificent, enclosed space whose prime purpose is to give people of any and all persuasions a place in which to reflect. 

The Citizens’ War Memorial, when viewed from east of The Square, presents a relatively plain rear façade. This is not a significant problem given the extent of the surrounding built environment, but if it were to be shifted to another open city space, this would present a serious visual difficulty given the possibly long vistas from any direction. The Memorial is absolutely a site-specific monument and as such is totally unsuitable for shifting away from its designated site. The Christchurch Civic Trust has a particular concern for urban planning matters and is alarmed at the ramifications for inner city neighbourhood living that any shift would raise: siting, orientation, impact on living values and the like.  

It appears to have been all too easy for the RSA to claim some sort of ownership of the Citizens’ War Memorial. It commemorates the ultimate sacrifice made by men and women from Canterbury, but those who remember are in fact all people – from greater Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand, the globe. The memorial is owned by the citizens of Christchurch and is administered and cared for by the funds from those ratepayers. The RSA’s line of thinking, that the War Memorial must be shifted at its request, may well be borne of years of post-earthquakes frustration, but it carries an ill-founded proprietorial attitude and fails to take into account all relevant heritage and urban planning factors. 

I’d like to conclude with a brief comment from Professor Chris Kissling, Chair Christchurch Civic Trust: “The submission certainly represents my personal view regarding the war memorial staying where it is. I do not believe the restoration work on the Cathedral requires the shift of the war memorial and I have not seen any cogent arguments for such an undertaking. 

The Citizens’ War Memorial is not a chess piece to be moved from square to square at the whim of current players who have decision-making power.” 

The Christchurch Civic Trust and Historic Places Canterbury both urge Mayor and Councillors to reject the request by the RSA for the removal of the Citizens’ War Memorial from the heart of the city, Cathedral Square. 

Historic Places Canterbury Deputation to The Christchurch City Council Draft Heritage Strategy 2019-2019

Historic Places Canterbury Deputation to Christchurch City Council.

Thursday 27thSeptember 2017.

“Thank You” Mayor and Councillors for granting Historic Places Canterbury’s (HPC) Request to make this Deputation.

This Deputation is made in reference to the Draft Heritage Strategy, Item 28 on today's Council Meeting Agenda.

HPC is aware it is proposed that the Draft Heritage Strategy be put out for Consultation and a Panel Hearing, and this Deputation confines itself to the process of Engagement used.

HPC commends the Councillors for adopting a process of Engagement where the Community and Individuals drove the formulation of the Draft Heritage Strategy. HPC also Commends the CCC Heritage who with professionalism and a vigour, almost bordering on enthusiasm, engaged the Community. It is this Chairs opinion there cannot be many individuals or community groups who missed out on the Council Heritage Team’s determined Engagement.

  1. Firstly, Historic Places Canterbury wishes to formally record a Thank You, to you the Councilors, who approved the Engagement that effectively allowed the Heritage Team to go out to the Community and ask what they wanted in their Heritage Strategy. As HPC Chair I Would like to record my appreciation for the leadership shown by the Councillors who participated in the Engagement.

As Chair I heard the Mayor, Councillors Clearwater and Galloway participated in Workshops and Councillors Livingstone and Johanson attended the Community Report Back.  For those Councillors who attended Engagement Events and I have omitted to mention, please accept my apologies, as my excuse is the Engagement was so extensive it was difficult to keep up with who attended where.

 

  1. Historic Places Canterbury requests the Councillors pass on to the Heritage Team our appreciation of the design of the Engagement process and its execution, that led up to this Draft Heritage Strategy.

Their efforts were recognized with a Commendation at this year’s Canterbury Heritage Awards.

As Chair there are two snapshots that sum up the Heritage Teams approach:

  1. The Heritage Team Social, Community Development Housing Committee report on what I call the Research Phrase. I considered the report and its contents to be very good one and as you will be aware, I lobbied quite hard at the coffee break for its findings to be reported back to the Community. The Heritage Team were so immersed in the process they may have not been aware of the interest in the report’s contents. I received a phone later in the day seeking my informal feedback on an outline for a proposed community report back. They were quick to respond to any suggestions and adjust their processes.
  2. Draft Heritage Strategy Workshop: One participant observed to me "You open your mouth and four Council Staff start taking notes".

HPC considers that an Engagement Process as followed by the Heritage Team, where open, practical, flexible and very early stakeholder involvement occurs will lead to a solution that is more acceptable and effective. HPC considers this should be the Christchurch City Council template.

 

Mark Gerrard
Chair Historic Places Canterbury